Sunday, March 22, 2009

Blog #9 - The Iraq War

Coming into its 7th year, the Iraq War may be winding down based upon President Obama's plan to shift the front of the war on terror to Afghanistan and take it to the Taliban and Al- Qaeda. Out of the 130,000 soldiers in Iraq, Obama wants to leave around 50,000 in Iraq though Congressional Democrats want to leave only 15,000 in the country.

When the history of the war will be written, historians will have to consider several questions (2 of which you'll answer below):
1. What should future generations be taught about the war?


2. What do you think we will remember about the war after it's all over?


200 words total - Answer due by Wednesday, March 25

Washington Post military correspondent Thomas E. Ricks stated at the conclusion of his latest book on the war, The Gamble, that the events for which the war will be most remembered have not yet happened. Maybe that's true. Maybe not. I believe most people will remember the prison torture scandal of Abu Ghraib. They'll remember the statue of Saddam toppeling over, and they'll probably won't forget the haphazard reconstruction efforts in the first few months of the occupation in the spring and summer of 2003.








The Nation's coverage of the war: http://www.thenation.com/sections/iraq_war


41 comments:

Matt Trogu said...

I think that future generations should be taught about the good and the bad that happened in the war. For example one of the good things that happened in the war was the capture of Saddam Hussein. The only thing is the way that they killed him was bad. The Iraqi people videotaped him dying. One of the bad things that are happening right now is that the United States government is paying billions of taxpayer dollars on the war. Also I think that the future generation should be taught about the reasons of the war, true and fake. Also the should be taught about the casualties of war and how many soldiers died (car bombs, roadside bombs, and regular warfare). After this is all over I think I will remember how Saddam Hussein was found hiding in a hole underground in the backyard of a little house. Also I will think back at how we have yet to find Osama Bin Laden and I would think where he could be. Could we have ever tried harder to capture him, or did we even want to find him. Another major thing that I would remember is when the citizens of Iraq pulled the statue down of Saddam Hussein. These are the things that should be taught and the things that are most memorable to me.

Evan Fried said...

There are to very important questions historians must consider before they write the history of the War on Terror. The first is what will we remember about the war, and the second is what should be taught about the war. Things that should be remembered are things like how we captured Saddam Hussein and how we tortured detainees at Guantanamo Bay. Bush said in 2004 that the invasion of Iraq was a Mission Accomplished that should defiantly be remembered. Things that should be taught are things like how many soldiers were killed and why the war was even fought in the first place. Style of warfare should be taught. We will remember the moments that defined our nation like 9/11 and how many soldiers died. We will be taught the background of all these things, the numbers, why they happened, who was involved. Events that occurred will be looked over again and again to find the best way to put it down in the history books. The fact that there were no weapons of mass destruction will probably not be remembered heavily but will defiantly be taught. The events that will be remembered are the ones that you think of when someone says 9/11. Details are left to what’s to be taught.

Brandon Kauth said...

1. What should future generations be taught about the war?
Future generations should be taught about why we went into Iraq in the first place. Weather it be for oil or to distinguish weapons of mass destruction. The future generations should be taught about Iraqs past and what Saddam Hussein has done to his own people. We came into Iraq to liberate the country and throw off the corrupt government that possibly had WMDs. Also the type of guerilla warfare that is being waged on our troops. (boobytraps, ieds, etc.) We need to teach that this invasion was for a cause. We as a country cared about another nation that was facing crisis from a dictator.

2. What do you think we will remember about the war after it's all over?
Well the war is still not over. If the end of the war is Iraq with a successful democracy, we would remember that. We will remember capturing Saddam and hanging him as well. Also the costs and causalities will be remembered. Those numbers do come close to what happened in Vietnam. We will remember the removal of the Saddam statue in downtown Iraq. Some will remember the torture that took place in prison camps.

Allison Woodberg (5th hour) said...

I think that the future generations should be taught both sides of the war with Iraq, so that they have all the facts and the opinions. I also think that future generations of students should be taught how the war started, and what has kept the war going for so long. I think in order to understand the war on terror students need to be taught about the viewpoints of both groups of people that are fighting. I think that there should be a commemoration of all of the soldiers who fought in the war who died and were injured. The effects that the war had on the economy should also be discussed. Future students should know the strain that was put on the citizens of the country financially, because of all the spending used on the war. They should know these things so that maybe some of the things that happened can be avoided in the future. When the war is over I think we will remember how long the war went on, and how many people lost their lives. I think people will remember the struggle that was put on people financially during this time also. People will remember the leaders during this war, who kept it going and who ended it. The main thing I think people will remember about the war with Iraq is how terrorism can affect any country, big or small, and how it can be never-ending.

bobby haag said...

(3rd)
When historians will write about the Iraq war, they have the two questions to answer: what did we remember and what should be taught about the war. I think there are a lot of things to remember about the war. For one, we should remember the spending of trillions of dollars due to the war and the capture of Saddam Hussein, and his execution. I think we should also remember the torture involving Abu Ghraib. The other question is about what should be taught. I think the number of soldiers killed and the number of Iraqi causalities should be taught. Also, we should know the reason of the war and our style of warfare used. There is a lot of information to add to the overall descriptions historians will write.

Anonymous said...

What should future generations be taught about the war? I think that future generations should be taught about the so called weapons of mass destruction assumed by President Bush and his party along with the happenings of September 11th. Also they should be taught about Saddam Hussein and his reign of power along with Osama Bin Laden. They should be taught about why It happened and they should be taught about other ways of fighting this was without doing what we decided to do not saying it was the wrong decision but there were other ways to fight this war without just going right in and doing what we did. What do I think we will remember about this war after it is all over? I think we will remember September 11th and what It did to America, I think we will remember the fall of Saddam Hussein and I think we will overall remember that as long as there is terrorism and as long as people are dying there will never be a true winner to this war. I think we will remember the decisions President Bush made to enter this was and I think we will remember the number of soldiers we lost in the war, but the thing I think we will remember the most about this war is that we went in being told there was going to be weapons of mass destruction and there wasn’t..

Jacob Silver 4th hour

Anonymous said...

Paige Peak
The future generations should be taught why the war came upon us, like the specific reasons such as 9/11 and how President Bush was putting the country to war just because of his relationship with his father which was his way of competing. They should be taught why Bush said we were going to war which was to find WMD. Although many believed it was not. They should be taught about previous altercations with Iraq and why 9/11 really happened who was behind, it if they were captured or not. The future generations should be taught about the alliances with other countries for both Iraq and the Unites States. As far as the war being over people will remember the trillions of dollars it cost. All the people that were killed. The economy going bad and the United States being in a recession. The first African American president who was to come in and get most if the people out of Iraq and move the soldiers to where they were originally supposed to be fight and looking for the weapons of mass destruction which have not been found. People will remember how bad the war was in general

Anonymous said...

The future generations will be taught about the war. One of the things i think the generations should be taught about is how many americans and iraqis died as a result of a war. another thing i think they should be taught is how the war was started and how the coligation forces attack iraq. one more thing i they they should teach is the warefare they used in the war.

after the war is over people will remember alot of things. one of them is how long we were there for, once we leave. people will also remember all the troops lost there lives in iraq serving our country. People will also remember 9/11 and how much pain it caused for the united states.

Tim T. said...

The future generation should learn about the good moments and the bad moments in the war. We should start by teaching them how this war began and how many theories there are that the government and the Bush cabinet went into Iraq. We should remember and teach the moment the Iraq people were taking done the statue of Saddam Hussein. Then capturing him in the bunker he built, people were disappointed not to see Saddam Hussein die on live TV but the Iraq government and the American government decided to do it early morning and with no crowd because the were worried Saddam Hussein follower would try to stop the hanging. Yes I know that the tape could be fake, but this time he is died because nobody wanted him alive. Another good moment was the surge of American troops in Iraq. We should talk about how much money the government spent in this war. The number of good men and woman died in this contradicting war. The worst thing we could have done in this war was let Osama bin Laden run free into a different country. The last thing we should teach and remember is the terrorists groups and how much they hated the U.S. and how so much hate can lead into a 7 year war. The thing we should remember are the thing we are teaching to our future generation about the war.

Sam S 5th hour said...

Future generations should be taught many things about the war. Some things that I think they should be taught are how the war started, and how much this war has put the US in debt. Also I think schools should go over how the government has handled the war, what they are exactly going after, and their goals in this war. I also think the schools should talk about how many soldiers went to war and how many died in this war. The schools should be taught about the tragedy of 9/11 and how many lives were lost on that day.
I think we will remember how 9/11 sparked this war. I will remember how the war affected the economy, and how the gas prices went up. I will remember the statue of Sadam falling down and how that symbolized the fall of his empire. I also will remember the search for Bidladen, and how our troops tried so hard to locate them, and came so close. I will also remember the war as the US trying to stop Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological destruction, and how dangerous Iraq was with those technologies, because they were not responsible enough to have them.

Johanna said...

1. Personally I believe that future generations should be taught about the war in a neutral way. That means that you look at all the sides; the good and the bad ones. It is also important to know some background information about the first gulf war, the situation in Iraq before the war and also simply the history of Iraq. I think it is important that teachers won’t tell their students that the war was totally legitimate and that the U.S along with Great Britain was freeing the world from terrorism. With all the media we have nowadays, students should look at the devastating pictures and TV reports from the war zone in order to try to fully understand how horrible war is for everyone.
It should be taught how many people lost their lives, how soldiers got stop-loss, how many suffer from mental illnesses, how the U.S used torture in Guantanamo, how Saddam Hussein got caught, how people got on with their everyday life, other nations point of view in the war…
2. I think when we remember the war in Iraq we immediately think of 9/11. That’s just in a way programmed in our heads. All the horrible images of Ground Zero will come up again. Then, we will remember the pictures of Saddam’s statue falling in Baghdad and of the hole in which he was hiding and of course his death. We will remember the horrible pictures we saw on TV about the war and torturing in Guantanamo and President Bush’s assuring us that Iraq has WMDs. The most what I think we will remember is that there wasn’t a winner or a loser and that many people got lied at.

Lisa surnow fifth said...

Years from now when looking back on this long war, there are many things that people will remember and should learn about. I think when learning about the Iraq war people should know the reasons why it started and what was accomplished. While some believe that this war had little point and the weapons of mass destruction were just an excuse for George Bush to finish up what his father had started we still have see through that and find the good in why we went in. I know that war is never a good thing but our government thought it was right to send troops in especially after 9-11. That day should be taught to every student so they remember how much it hurt the United States. It affected our economy, the environment, and especially the hearts of many Americans who lost someone close to them in that terrible terrorist attack. Another thing that should be taught is our achievements in Iraq. One of them being catching Saddam Hussein and bringing him out of power. A memorable moment from that is the falling of his statue, which was a symbol of his former people becoming free from his cruel dictatorship ways. Its important for kids in our country to learn about what is happening in Iraq so we do not repeat errors that were made and remember all of the lives that were lost and the millions of people that were affected by it.

Anonymous said...

There are many things to consider about the war. How it should be taught in the classrooms and what we will remember, as the current generation will remember about this war. Personally, I remember when we first invaded Iraq, it was terrible. The things we need to teach to other generations about this war is that why and how the president, George W. Bush persurved the congress. That Saddam Hussein, the dictator of Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. President George W. Bush went to congress. About ten years earlier (early 1990s), Iraq had WMDs mostly mustard gas, tabun, sarin and tear gasses. In 2001 Saddam stated that "we are not at all seeking to build up weapons or look for the most harmful weapons . . . however, we will never hesitate to possess the weapons to defend Iraq and the Arab nation”. With that said, in 2003, the United States, Britain, smaller contingents from Australia, Spain, Poland, and Denmark invaded Iraq to cease the production of WMDs and to capture Sadden Hussein. Overall, we will remember we never found any WMDs and that the President of United States was wrong and lied. In 2004 how George W. Bush said “Mission Accomplished” and we are still in Iraq. The taxpayers in Oakland country will pay on average for the war is about $2.9 billion dollars total over their lifetime. Every day, we will keep losing soldiers and our debt will just keep getting higher, and our economy will suffer greatly.

Tyler DeWald (3th hour)

Sarra Serhane 5th said...

The war in Iraq is a war that will be remembered and looked back on for many years to come. Future generations should be taught
a lot about the war so it is not repeated. They should be taught that we caught Saddam Hussein, the torture that occured, why were
even there in the first place, what initally started it, and if we actually accomplished anything or not. Future generations should be taught
these things specifically because these topics are the things that affect us the most today. They should know about Saddam Hussein because if we never caught him, we would have
never known if they actually had weapons of mass distruction or not. Also, they should be taught that people were tortured because that should never be repeated in the future.
Furthermore, since I feel that we have not been taught enough about the war today,future generations should be taught what started the war and why were there in the first place
to make sure a war like this doesn't happen again. Lastly future generations should be taught weather or not we found weapons of mass distruction or not because that was a big
part of the reason why we were there.
Things that we will remember most are how expensive the war was and the amount of people that died because of the war. We will remember how many people died because when someone
loved is lost at war, it has a lifetime affect of the person's family and friends. Families of those who lost loved ones who were not fighting in the war will also remember the
war. Also, we will rememver how expensive it was because we will be paying it off for a very long time. It was also of the most expensive wars in United States' history.

Allison Smart said...

This was a big event in US history and should be taught to future generations. First of all both points of views should be taught. We wouldn’t really understand it unless we got the Iraqi views. How and when the Iraq war started should be taught. 9/11 should be tied in to one of the leading causes, along with how many terrorists were invading Iraq. Saddam Hussein should be mentioned and what he was doing over seas. The leaders of both sides should be taught because they play a major role in what decisions were made. Students should know of how the war impacted our economy, people, and politics. Students should also know how much money we spent and how this affected us back in the United States. When the war is finally over I believe that many Americans will remember the lives that were given for our country in combat but also in 9/11. We will remember how much money was spent and the leaders that made a difference. We will remember how Saddam Hussein was found hiding in a hole and when his statue was pulled down by Iraqi citizens. These are the things that should be taught and remembered about the Iraq War.

Jake Prosyniuk said...

1. I think they should be taught about why we first entered the war, then why it was impossible to have a definitive victory. The true reasons for why we did it have yet to be revealed, but I think that they should be remembered once they do come out, especially because there could be some ill-intent in our motives, that we didn’t even know about. We were not able to win the war, even though we poured in troops and money to it for years. This is because the opposing force is able to recruit infinitely, because of the hate for America that much of Iraq has. We should also teach why it was so easy for Iraqi’s to turn against us, and what we did to them, to cause this hate.
2. I think we will remember the troubles it caused our country, how we felt about entering and being in the war, and other less meaningful things (where we were when big events happened: 9/11, the fall of Baghdad, capture of Saddam). We’ll remember that a majority of our country opposed the war by the end of it, because there was no end in sight at the time. We’ll remember what we thought about President Bush, and how the budget deficit and huge national debt affected us.

Anonymous said...

Dallas Paritee:
There should be many things known and taught about the war in Iraq. I think there are many things that should be remembered but not taught. First of all there were casualties, these were either killed wounded or P.O.W’s of the war. This shouldn’t be forgotten because of the many Americans/ Iraqis that have lost their lives. I also think they should be taught about how many American troops those were sent because they were used more efficiently. They should also be taught about Abu Ghraib and Saddam’s statue being torn down. These are two very important events that need to be known. First of all in Abu Ghraib some of the prisoners (Iraqis) were being stripped down with bags over their faces and then were posted to the internet. Many were outraged at these images that made the U.S. look bad. The statue of Saddam was also a crucial event because it showed how the people were done with their leader and his ways. The most important facts I feel are the ones that should be taught. Like how the government wasted trillions of dollars in the war. This has caused a huge problem in the economy. Saddam’s capture and one of the questions most likely to be asked over and over, “What was the cause of the war”. Most say It was due to WMDs, The 9/11 attacks, or Oil.

Mike Mafrice said...

There are many things to remember and to be taught about the Iraq war. For example future generations should be taught about how the whole war started. People should be taught how the war affected the economy in the U.S. Also how the families whose brave sons and daughters were affected. We should remember Saddam Hussein was captured and what was done to him after he was captured. Future generations should be taught about how many people for both sides in the war and not only soldiers but the innocent people. One thing that will be remembered is when the statue of Saddam Hussein was torn down. The combat style i think will be both taught and remembered because it wasn't your normal war with many battles it was a kind of more gorilla type warfare. Another thing that will be remembered will be the U.S finding no weapons of mass destruction, which was one of the main reasons why we invaded Iraq. People should be taught about how we still haven't found Osama Bin Laden and how he could still be out there today. I think America will remember Obama and Bush's different outlooks on the war. Finally, people should remember the final outcome of the war which is still to be determined.

Joe Wallace said...

1. I think that it is important that future generations are taught the truth about the war in Iraq. They should be taught enough to give them a good understanding of it so that it doesn’t happen again. First they should be taught the real reason to why it started. This is obviously important because everybody has their own opinion to why it started but everybody needs to know the truth. It will also be important to teach future generations about the leaders of each country involved and what they had to do with it. They should also be taught about 9/11 and if it sparked the war in any way. Finally and probably most importantly future generations should be taught how the war impacted the whole country.

2. I think that people will remember a lot from this war once it’s over because it had such a big impact on the whole country. Although I do think there are some things that will be remembered more than others. It will be remembered for how expensive it was because it is one of the most expensive wars ever. I also think that the number of people died will be remembered because it is such a high number and just keeps building up. Finally on a more negative not I think that people will remember Guantanamo Bay and the fact that we never found any WMDs.

Alana Walker (5th Hour) said...

1. The things I think should be taught about the Iraq War are, the number of casualties on both sides, because everyone should know how many lost their lives fighting for their safety. I also think the future generations should be taught about the amount of money this war has cost because that will be their debt to pay off. The cause for the Start of the War and the End of the war should be taught as well to the future generation. The Torture done in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba is something that should be taught, even though it is something The US would rather forget, it still happened, so it should be taught so it will NEVER happen again.


2. I think the US people, and the World will remember the Iraq War. I especially think they will remember the cost, because we will be paying it off for a long time. I also think they will remember the Torturing the US did in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The US did terrible things, and that’s not something that will be forgotten anytime soon. The amount of Casualties, and those captured will always be remembered. There have been 31,102 deaths (according to http://icasualties.org/Iraq/index.aspx).

Jack DiLaura said...

Blog #9 Jack Dilaura - 5th hour
1. I think that future generations should be taught the effects of the war on people, politics, and the economy. I think that they should also learn about how the war started and why it lasted for so long. I think that it's most important to learn the effects of the war because the future generations will be able to see how wars can shape and change a lot of our daily life. I also think that they should learn how the war began so that they can avoid this problem if it comes again.
2. I think the thing we will remember the most will be the effect it had on us. We will remember the money that we spent on the war, and the lives lost. We will also remember how this was a big issue in politics and in the election. I think the most important things to remember are the effects on the economy. We should try to balance our budget better next time so we don’t put all of our money into the war. It’s true that the war was not the only cause of the recession we are in, but it did play a part in it.

Jake Chmara said...

I think there are a few things that future generations should be taught about the war. One thing should be the casualties and hardships that were experienced in the war. This may not seem much to the average citizen, but to the soldiers and families of soldiers, it is a huge deal. Another thing that should be taught is the reason for invading Iraq, the goals that we planned to accomplish, and if we ever met those goals and how the whole thing turned out. There is a lot of discussion and argument over what the purpose of being there is and if we have accomplished our tasks yet. This war is a huge part of American history and should be taught just like every other war has been taught. I think that people will remember the problems that the war has caused more than anything. It created violent conflict and rough connections between governments. It also created a large fear among Americans of people who come from the Middle East. Many stereotypes have been created that result from this ongoing conflict. People will also remember those who died in battle. Every day, if you watch the news, there are stories of young Americans who died fighting for our country. That is something that many Americans will remember and will hope to never see again.

Tyler Porritt (5th) said...

I think that future generations should be taught everything about the war, good and bad. They should learn about the reasons that started it, such as 9/11. They should also learn about how the war has impacted people at home. They need to learn the effects that it has had on the economy, politics, and Americans. One of the main things that should be taught is how many people died in the war in Iraq. This is a very important part of the war. Future generations not only need to know how many Americans died, but also how many Iraqi citizens died in the crossfire. They also should know how other nations felt about the U.S. going into Iraq.

We will remember many things about this war, but some main parts stick out. We will always remember how expensive it has been, as it has affected the people back in the states. We will remember that we did not find any Weapons of Mass Destruction, but we also found and hung Saddam Hussein. One thing that most people will remember is that we tortured suspected terrorists at Guantanamo Bay. People will also remember how many people died during this war, and the cost it has had on America.

Elaina Gardner said...

1) I think that future generations should be taught about how the war started. I also think they should be taught how many people died and the form of torture that was used during the war. In addition to the torture they used they should also tell what they used it for. The most important thing to learn though is how it dragged on and how it affected people. I think what many people don't consider is it's affecting some people at home alot more than we all consider and our country needs to get out of this war before more people have to lose their lives. A big thing we need to teach the next generations is how 9/11 affected everyone. For our future generations they really wont have the same understanding as us cause they won't have lived through it. We need to make them understand how much this affected the country and everyone in it.
2) When the war is over i think we'll remember the money spent on it and how much it affected our economy. I think we'll remember who sent them their and why we originally went there. I think we'll remember how many deaths their were and the horrible torture used. We'll remember the saddam statue coming down and how people were affected by the war. The most important thing is to remember how it went and why it went that way. After all we can't let history repeat itself.

Barry Clay said...

1. What should future generations be taught about the war?
I believe that future generations should be taught about what Saddam Hussein did, his role in the Iraqi society and what he did to get his way such as using chemical weapons on his own people and his connection to oil. Also the quest for weapons of mass destruction in Iraq and the conspiracy of the government lying to the citizens to get oil instead of stopping terrorism should be taught. In the future the fact that the U.S. violated the rules of engagement as set by the U.N.. How gas prices jumped and how that affected the average citizen should be taught. Also how many people actually died on both sides should be taught.

2. What do you think we will remember about the war after it's all over?
I think 9/11 will be remembered extremely well in the future and footage of this event will probably be shown. And the major opponents such as Bin Laden and Saddam Hussein will be remembered. A famous quote will probably George W. Bush’s “Mission Accomplished” that was taken out of context the first time it was heard by America to us actually winning the war. Another memorable moment will be the moment that Saddam Hussein’s statue was pulled to the ground representing much wanted separation. The conspiracy of the government going into Iraq just for oil and other corrupt purposes will most likely be remembered.

Anonymous said...

Mary Seymour 3rd hour
1. What should future generations be taught about the war? I think future generations should be taught about how it came to be as bad as it is. They should learn how many soldiers we lost and their devestated wives and children. They should be taught about how many Iraqi citizens were killed too. They should learn all of the bad thing about the war so then they will never want war. They should learn about how the oil affected the economy so we decided to try to change it so we went to war and that hurt our economy extrememly bad.
2. I think after the war is all over, we will remember the videos about it. We will remember how devestated we all were as the soldiers were being killed and we would hear about them. I know I will remember how we went there to get a better supply of oil, which will never pay off because we have lost too many people. We will remeber the surviving soldiers and how proud we should be of them for fighting for our country. We will also remember how we had to pay for the war and it probably mad the debt much worse because of all the weapons and tanks and other things our military used during the war.

Anonymous said...

I believe that future generations should be taught a lot on the war with Iraq. When teachers are teaching on with the war with Iraq they should include why the war even began. They should also include the amount of casualties that occurred during the war. Another fact that should be included within the lesson plan, in the future, should be the type of warfare used, and the torture that occurred. However, the most important fact that should definitely be taught is how long the war continued, and the impact/effect it had on people and their lifestyles. When teaching on the Iraq war, 9/11 should definitely be a big topic of discussion.
After the conclusion of the war, I believe the most important thing we will remember will be all the money spent on the war, not to mention the efforts involved in the war. We will also remember the capture, and the execution of Saddam Hussein. We will also remember the amount of deaths involved in the war, and the toll it had on the country, and families everywhere. I believe the fear that the war created, and the impact it had on our country and the people in it, will forever be remembered.
Allacia Gibson

Anonymous said...

I think future generation should be taught what happen or what lead up to the 9/11 terrorists attacks on the World Trade Centers. I think it is important for future students that it wasn’t just Bush Jr who had issues with the terrorists, but so did Bill Clinton and George HW Bush. Was there any way we could have stopped the 9/11 attacks mouths or even years before they even happened? I think people will always remember 9/11 and the days after it, watching the news and seeing how many lives were took on that tragic day. I also think students should be taught about the war from the US, Iraqi, and Afghan side of things. Why did the terrorists hijack planes and crash then into the towers? Who is to blame? And Why? I think all of that should be taught. Many years from now when the words “War on Terror” are spoken from someone’s mouth I think people will think of George Bush as being the president during that time and his 8 years in office. People will also remember Barrack Obama as the president at the hopeful end of the war. There is one thing for sure this war will never ever be forgotten.

Kevin L.

Anonymous said...

I think future generations should be taught a lot about the Iraq war. They should be taught about how the war started and why the war started, because it is always important for people to know causes and it will also teach them about 9/11. They should also be taught about the people in power in Iraq, like Saddam and they should be taught of all the bad things he did to his country and his people. Also they should be taught about the casualties and how the war was fought so they won’t forget that you have to pay a price for being in a war. America also spent trillions of dollars in the war so they should learn about that. I will remember most things about the Iraq war. I will remember when the first convoy of troops arrived in Baghdad and when the statue of Saddam was pulled down by a tank with all the Iraqis cheering next to it. Also I will remember all of the money and time we spent in the war because it’s so far been 7 yrs and were still there. And we are spending a lot of money and its still adding up.
Ishmael

Donavin Camarata 5th hour said...

I think that future generations should be taught about the war that it was a very expensive war that dramatically affected manly Americans. Future generations should also be taught how many people died and the overall purpose of the war. We should also point out the main reasons we went in Iraq such as finding the WMD were not accomplished and we only found Saddam(but after months of searching). We should teach about how torture was done in Guantanamo to alleged terrorists. We should also show and explain the significance of the statue of Saddam toppling down.
For us remembering the war, we should remember how it all started and what were the main reasons for the war? Who were the leaders that agreed(All men with past war experiences)? We need to know that 9/11 was a spark to the war also Saddam lying he was in possession of a WMD. We will also remember that war greatly affected the American people back home financially and emotionally. People may say the war was good cause we had minimal casualties, but to those people that actually lost someone close to them they will think the war was too costly or took everything from them.

Danielle Madgy said...

Since the war in Iraq, we have been sending over hundreds or troops to go fight for our country. But what happens the war is over? Are we going to forget about it and never teach it to younger generations, probably not! The first thing we should teach are how it started, for example September 11, 2001. Some people could think that this started the war. Another thing could be all of the people who died, who was in charge and how they handled it, and even what types of weapons were used. We will also remember how many people died and how it really affected the United States. We will also remember the main people in charge, such as Saddam Hussein. We will also remember about what originally happen in 9/11 and always remember about terrorists, and how they can severely affect our country.

Katie Nicholls, 5th hour said...

What I think that the future generations should be taught about the war is how it started. Not many young people would know how it started because they didn’t know what was going on. Some people, still, today might not know how it started. I also think that they should be taught about who was in charge of it all and who the leader was. Again, the younger generations didn’t quite know who George Bush was and what he did for this country. So just like every other president, he should be learned about. They should also be taught about whether or not the people of America agreed with what Bush had to say and the actions he did. Another thing the future generations should be taught is how the war impacted back at home (in the US), how it impacted the economy, the people, and politics.
Some things I think we’ll remember about the war after it’s all over is how expensive it was. People have had a lot of trouble with money lately, between the economy and war and everything in between, our money is going who knows where. Another thing we will always remember is the torture. For example, all of the torture in Guontanamo. We will also always remember that we didn’t find the W.M.D. but we found Saddam Hussein.

Anonymous said...

I think that future generations should be taught many things about the Iraq War. Some things I think they will remember are the cost of the war because it will total out to be very expansive. Another thing people will remember is the number of deaths and the number of people that were injured because these numbers were so high. Next, the fact that we went in to find the weapons of mass destruction and we never found them. Also, the torture that we put people through in Guantanomo. Lastly, when the statue of Saddam toppled down. I think that students in school or people in general should be taught about this brutal war also. They should be taught about how it started and when it started because that information is very important. Another thing is who were the leaders of the war and did people agree with who was leading the U.S through the war. Next, that the main cause of the war was September 11, 2001 because then they will understand how 9-11 had an impact on it. Lastly, how it had an impact on the import and export of goods and how it affected the people and the economy.

Amanda -5th Hr.

Anonymous said...

I feel that future generations should be taught the consequences and struggles you have to go through when your nation is at war. They should also be taught during war times are more so the hard times because most of the soldiers who leave to go fight war they don’t always come back. It would be best if parents actually explained to their kids what was going on in the world so that when time comes for them to grow up and be on their own, they would have a clear understanding of what war actually is. They should be taught that people who go and fight for our country are not doing because they want to cause destruction but because they want to eliminate the people who are causing all the deaths of innocent people so that we can come together as a nation.
The thing I think that we will remember the most about the war is how many people actually lost their lives to fight for our country. We will remember most of all the brave soldiers who risked their lives so that the people back home could have a better and safe living experience. People will also remember how we struggled on how bad we tried to get our soldiers to come home from fighting a pointless war, and all the lives that the war has taken. We will remember the innocent people who could not take cover and lost their lives form being an innocent by stander during the war. Most of all we will remember the soldiers who come home who has been able to make it back and we will appreciate them for what they have done for us, and hopefully as a nation we will come together.

china

Katie Robinson said...

Katie Robinson:

1. Future generations will have to be taught a lot about the war in Iraq. They will have to study how the war started, the important dates, and the key points of the war. They will also need to know how many people died (from both Iraq and the United States) and also some of the important leaders. They will also study the affects of the war at home. This war has put us deeply into debt, and it will be a huge part of lessons. So they will also want to know how much the war cost us.
2. We will want to remember a lot of the same things that we will want to teach the kids in our schools. We will want to remember how much this war cost the United states in both lives and money. We will want to remember how the people reacted, and how the war has changed every-day life in our country. At first, we were in Iraq searching for weapons of mass destruction. Now we know that we have not found them. We will also always remember September 11th, 2001. The day that the twin towers were attacked was the day that all of this started.

Luke Szczurek said...

1. I think that the future generations should be taught about this war for sure. They should learn about the reasons that have started this. They should deffinatly lear about 9/11 and how that killed so many americans and how it was such a sad time. They should learn about Al-Qaeda and what they are all about and there past with america. They should learn about how many people died for america and the other country to and how it affected the people of those countrys. They also need to learn about how this economically affected us to.
2. After this war is all over and were all in peace with everyone i think well remember a lot. Well deffinatly remember 9/11 and how it killed around 3.000 people and how it affected so many american lives. We will remember the saddam statue getting pulled down and everyone cheering and excited that he is gone and no longer in control. For those that lived through this time will remember how such a sad time it was and how shocking it was. It was very unexpected for most of us. We'll remember how this war raised the oil prices and affect all americans.

Anonymous said...

CHANEL

1. What should future generations be taught about the war?
**Just as this generation beieves. They should most likely know the whole history of the war and why it occured. Questions such as who, what, when, where and why should all be something of future generations knowledge. One of the first things they should be taught is that it was an ongoing military campaign type thing that started on March 20, 2003 with the invasion of Iraq by a multinational force now led by troops from the United States and The United Kingdom. They should be taught about the point of view from Iraq and The United States and what their missions were.
2.What do you think we will remember about the war after it's all over?
**I think that we will remember every event that occured leading up to the war. Those who lost friends and family will always remember everything that occured and why there was a war and how it began. We will remember capturing Saddam and killing him and the and deaths of loved ones.We will remember the removal of the Saddam statue in downtown Iraq. We will remember many little things leading up to the war becuase we lived through it, Heard about it on the news many times or Lost a family member.

Anonymous said...

I think that future generations should be taught many things about the Iraq War. Some things I think they will remember are the cost of the war because it will total out to be very expansive. Another thing people will remember is the number of deaths and the number of people that were injured because these numbers were so high. Next, the fact that we went in to find the weapons of mass destruction and we never found them. Also, the torture that we put people through in Guantanomo. Lastly, when the statue of Saddam toppled down. I think that students in school or people in general should be taught about this brutal war also. They should be taught about how it started and when it started because that information is very important. Another thing is who were the leaders of the war and did people agree with who was leading the U.S through the war. Next, that the main cause of the war was September 11, 2001 because then they will understand how 9-11 had an impact on it. Lastly, how it had an impact on the import and export of goods and how it affected the people and the economy.
Amanda S.

Anonymous said...

Gauri said:
The first question is what should be taught about the Iraq war? According to me both the sides of the war should be made visible, the good and the bad one. Kids should be made aware of the gulf wars and some background information of the history of all the countries involved. They should also be taught about the situation in each country and the problems faced by them at that time. Then the reasons of the war, the activities that triggered this war which is still not over. Students should look at the devastating pictures and TV reports from the war zone in order to try to fully understand how horrible war was for everyone. It should be taught how many people lost their lives, how the U.S used torture in Guantanamo. The capture of Saddam Hussein should also be taught.

The second part of what I would remember will probably be the torture of saddam Hussein. Even sitting in my country I was seeing how he was found hiding in a hole in the backyard of some house. How he was hanged to death and what all the Americans did to torture him. It was a major discussed issue even in my country.

Next I would associate the 9/11 incident with this issue. The all pictures of ground zero would flash in my mind.

Anonymous said...

remembering the war:

Future generations should be taught many things about the war – such as how many people died, the cause of the war, and definitely about how much money that it’s costing the U.S. Even I am unsure of the cause of the war because I don’t hear people talking about it, on the news they usually just talk about what’s going on with the war. I know some of the causes but not entirely and I think it’s important for people to know. This is a war I don’t think should be forgotten because it’s a big part of our culture.
That being said, what should be taught should be remembered. We should not shy away from teaching the bad things about the war – and there are a lot – and certainly not shy away from remembering them. When Saddam’s statue fell over, and also when he was hanged, are truly important things that should not be forgotten. Events such as 9-11 greatly contributed to the war as well. Other things that should be remembered are the length of the war, the innocent people that were killed as well as those fighting, and the huge amount of money it’s costing the country.

Sydney

Chris Webberly said...

Future generations should be taught several things. How many people died, why war is such a powerful thing, and what could happen if a country does not go into war when it needs to, or goes into war when it isn’t necessary. The cause of the war, how much money was spent on the war, and why we acted the way we did. Osama Bin Laden was our main focus going into the war, but as you can see, it has somewhat changed. Suddam Hussein’s takedown was a great stride for Iraqi civilians and government, but our problems still have not been solved. Osama is still out there. Dead or alive, we don’t know. But hopefully, in the coming years, we will track him down.
We will remember the ones we lost, how gas prices went up, how Bush’s approval rating went down, and how some (not all) innocent Iraqi civilians were killed by gunfire. My generation of people will remember the images and news reports we saw as the war was going on, and we will remember the image of the two planes crashing into the WTC, and some will remember the family members they lost and how strong they were to persevere through this tough time of war.