Monday, May 31, 2010

Blog #33 - Follow up to Civil Rights unit - Racism dead? Klan in the classroom, say what?

Finally, this blog is getting close to being done.  Part of the reason I've taken a lot of time on it is because I've wanted to say exactly what I mean with the blog.  I try to do that with all of my blogs, but especially b/c this one tends to fall into a sensitive area, I want to be particularly careful about what is said. 

On Wednesday and Thursday, we discussed (as a long-overdue follow-up to our Civil Rights unit) some issues concerning race in America.  One issue concerned how Americans viewed racism after the 2008 election: 1. Was racism a pretty much done deal since the country had elected a black man, so let's, as a nation, move on to other things like our tanking economy?   2. Or, had America achieved some kind of post-racial enlightenment by electing Barack Obama, a man whose skin color would have kept him barred from an equal education had he lived in, say Topeka, Kansas back when Linda Brown lived in the early 1950s (he wasn't born until 1961)?  3. Or, as many of you voiced your opinion agreed, that racism hadn't perished in 2008 and that news of its death had been greatly exaggerated. 

We then turned our attention to the unfortunate occurrence in Lumpkin County H.S. in northern Georgia last week when a few American history students and their teacher offended students as they walked through the school hallways dressed in Klan robes (though the teacher claims that sheets were used, not robes).  The teacher didn't inform anyone of what she was doing, rumors spread throughout the school afterwards that the Klan had been roaming the halls, and that there had been no school-wide announcement to correct the record.  “The brief appearance of four robed and hooded figures caused a commotion in the cafeteria as several students became upset and angry. Some became angrier than others.” Principal Tracy Sanford said 1.

News Update!! - Apparently, in nearby Gwinnett County schools in Lawrenceville, GA, another social studies teacher had the same idea of dressing her kids up in Klan robes for a re-enactment and was told to stop.  However, by the time the teacher was told to stop, she had already done a similar activity with her 8th grade class at Sweetwater M.S..  In the Atlanta Journal Constitution article I found about this event, it makes one major distinction: the Gwinnett County teacher, Stephanie Hunte is black where as the Lumpkin H.S. teacher is white. 

The AJC's Rick Badie wrote about many of the issues that we had discussed in his editorial dated Friday, May 28.  Why weren't these things pre-approved by an administrator?  Why not inform the kids in the school as to what's going on before the students go traipsing through the halls?  But I think he misses the point when he says that the administrators will lend "an ear to those with objections."   I don't think many of us get the point here. 

(If you'd like to tell Mr. Badie your opinion, be respectful and send him a copy of your response and a link to the blog at his email address rbadie@ajc.com). 

The Rise of the Ku Klux Klan: Right-Wing Movements and National Politics (Social Movements, Protest and Contention)I don't think either of these projects should have gotten past the planning stages.  For the most part, asking kids to re-enact something in a structured framework is fine, even if they are reenacting a contentious, controversial or previously accepted idea in history (one makes me think of Social Darwinism).  But, I think there comes a point in time where some issues can be taught in a different way and do not need to be taught through re-enactment.   What were the teachers allowing the students to do as Klansmen?   When the student becomes the person who perpetrated the heinous race crimes, what are we actually trying to teach that child (especially when it comes to the 8th graders - seriously, are they having a moment of soul-searching reflection as the hoods slip over their heads)?  Then, the teachers didn't take into account other people, mainly students of color, who these re-enactments might negatively affect.  One student at Lumpkin H.S., Cody Rider, felt very strongly about it, and had to be restrained by members of the staff in the cafeteria (see video below).  Furthermore,  the Lumpkin H.S. teacher still thinks her students should have just filmed that segment off-campus, which to me, shows that she still doesn't get that there's anything wrong with having her students put on Klan robes...eh, sheets.  She thought she was doing the right thing by teaching her AP students about racism, but could she be teaching the nation something else instead?





I don't even know where to start with questions, b/c I think I answered most of my own questions above. 

Please answer the following questions:
1. Why does it seem that white America tends to be clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity?   If this Klan reenactment offends most members of the black community, but other black Americans don't say anything or other more visible black Americans just dismiss the media circus as a tempest in a teapot, who should you listen to?  Why? 
2. Watch the video below on Tim Wise talking about "How White People Talk About Race" and share your reactions.  Do you think his comments are accurate?  Why or why not? 




Due Thursday, June 3 - 200 words

Sources: 
1. http://chattahbox.com/us/2010/05/25/georgia-students-wear-klan-robes-through-school-with-teachers-ok/
2. http://www.ajc.com/news/gwinnett/gwinnett-schools-investigate-after-535560.html
3. http://www.ajc.com/opinion/rick-badies-gwinnett-a-537781.html?cxntlid=daylf_artr

31 comments:

Anonymous said...

Allie Rubin
3rd hour

1. It may seem that white America tends to be clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity because in the United States, white people are the majority. Manty may be unaware of what other races go through because, being part of the majority, white people have not experienced such things like attacks by the Ku Klux Klan or being forced to live in another area because of your race. If people do not speak up about the offensiveness of things like the Klan reenactment, people who are not offended by it will not see that it is offensive. Often, it is hard for people to know how someone else views something unless the other person shares their side, so it is important that people who are offended by the Klan reenactment explain or show that it is an offensive act to them.
2. I pretty much agree with the man in the video. There are some people who realize that racism does exist today and do not ignore it; however, I agree that there are also many people who do not think about racism often because they have never experienced it first hand. This lack of experience does make it difficult to discuss racism because, as Time Wise said, it's hard to talk about something that you know very little about. I do not think all white people are completely clueless. I think that there are many people who know that racism is around but chose not to acknowledge it actively.

Anonymous said...

1. White America seems to be clueless when it comes to racist sensitivity because they don’t have to deal with racial tension. They aren’t treated differently, or talked to differently. In society they aren’t looked at strange. Like today if a white American walked into an expensive store nobody would think anything of it, however if an black American walked in store employee’s would get curious and be more on the lookout. When it comes to listening to black Americans who state their opinion and those who don’t speak out I believe I would listen to neither. I would form my own opinion. I would figure out how I feel about the Klan reenactment instead of listening to others and their thoughts on it, and have their feelings base my thoughts as well.
2. I believe he is correct, white Americans are not in that position to feel inferior. However I don’t believe white Americans are in lala land, at least not now. We might have been years long ago, but now I believe we are coming to realize... we are no longer in lala land. I believe majority of his comments are accurate because he does use the reality of things, he states true facts.


Heather Robinson
2nd hour

Anonymous said...

Jim Weitzel #3
I think that as a whole the reason that white Americans don’t really know about sensitivity or racism in modern day times is because it just doesn’t impact them. If in your life you don’t talk about it or come in contact with it, a lot of people would say, “What’s that?” In modern day times a lot of places are still racially oriented, the reason I say oriented is that there is mixing among races and we each enjoy one another; but, from my perspective there are still majorities. So if you go to a school, a majority will be white kids, there will be other races but a majority will be white. Whereas in DPS a lot of the high school students that attend their schools are African American. If this Klan outrage upsets African Americans, I think that we should listen to the community that lives there and as a whole. Maybe they have different standards where they live, such that they will accept it. As a whole though you get more general feelings, because they will be a majority versus the few people that speak out against calling it a “media tempest,” I agree with Tim Wise on the issue that we as white Americans don’t talk about it, so when we need to think about it or talk about it it’s hard for us to communicate what we want. But I disagree a little bit with what he says about whites in the 1960s thinking that everything was equal racially. Whites had to hate African Americans if they were relegated to such a low standing in everyday American life. Obviously nowadays its better, but it’s hard to tell if its definite or even a giant step in the right direction.

Anonymous said...

Alex Pisano
third Hour

1. Why does it seem that white America tends to be clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity? If this Klan reenactment offends most members of the black community, but other black Americans don't say anything or other more visible black Americans just dismiss the media circus as a tempest in a teapot, who should you listen to? Why?
2. Watch the video below on Tim Wise talking about "How White People Talk About Race" and share your reactions. Do you think his comments are accurate? Why or why not?
1. White America tends to be clueless about racial sensitivity because many white, middle-class Americans grew up secluded from racism and violence. These middle class Americans would like to believe that racism is dead and that they only see people for who they really are, however, many of them are biased towards one view or another. Many adults now believe in sheltering their kids as they age, so they don’t have to deal with hatred and violence, ideas that were never made real to them, so they tend to ignore it when it really happens. People should listen to neither of these groups and instead form their own opinion on the matter. If a lack of perspective clouds your mind on the matter, go listen to some of the opinions on both sides and decide which one fits into your beliefs best.
2. His comments are accurate for most white Americans, but not for all of them. While most white Americans act shocked for a few days after such accidents and delude themselves into being taken off guard, others are aware of such things and try to do their best to even the playing ground a bit. Many Americans in general try to delude themselves into thinking that America is a utopia free of violence, it is easier to believe that those bangs heard weren’t gunshots; it was just a car backfiring next door. Most people who see violence keep their heads down and don’t do anything about it so they can remain uninvolved. What Tim Wise points out isn’t only true for white Americans, but for most Americans in general, over one thing or another.

Drew S. said...

I think the reason most of white America is or seems clueless to Racism is because they ignore it or because it is not a major issue to them they do not think about it. I also think this might be because they either don’t feel comfortable around talking about it or that they don’t want to talk about and or are trying to get people to ignore racism and by not acknowledging it they are accepting other(s) races.

I think the prominent black Americans ignore it because either a) think they will achieve nothing by talking about it and/or b) they think the way to get more white people to accept black people is to dismiss it just like the white people do.

I think it is in general about what he said in the YouTube clip, particularly, the part about white Americans not having to deal with racism issue and prejudice as much as black Americans do. I think it might be different if you live in either a) a neighborhood where the white person is the minority and/or b) you live in the intercity. In that case you probably have a greater understanding of racism in America. But for the most part in general, I would agree with Tim Wise.


Drew S.

Anonymous said...

Jim Stevens
3rd
1. I don't think that white America is essentially clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity. I think that because of how horrible other races were treated by white people in the past that white's still live with that reputation. I think that it is not just the whites who are racist, it is everyone now on such a larger scale. I personally have witnessed whites being discriminated against by other races. I think that ALL OF AMERICA in general is so clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity. The point is that unless America as a whole comes together and realizes that it isn't just one race that you can put the blame on, its all of them. I am however not condoning racism or the fact that whites are still a blame, I am just stating my view on racism.
2. I do agree with Tim wise. I agree with him because White Americans have gotten a terrible reputation because of what has been done in the past. it is such a sad thing that whites had treated blacks and other races so poorly in the past. This being said and done makes it uncomfortable for white people talking to black people about racism.

Anonymous said...

I believe that many white Americans tend to be clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity because they are simply unaware. I believe these people are unaware in several ways. Although this is not always true, I think that when a white American is being insensitive when it comes to race, they are not doing it on purpose- they just do not realize the severity of their words or actions. Many people who are not racially sensitive are also unaware in the sense that they do not know the past of the races they may be insulting. Because we live in a time where racism does not have as big a role in our lives, people may sometimes not be aware of what they are saying due to the fact that they would never really think that they would be offending someone.
When it comes to different opinions of African Americans, regarding the Klan situation, I don’t think it is completely clear who to listen to. While it is perfectly understandable why some black Americans may be offended, it is also possible that the media is twisting things (as it often does). When it comes down to it, it is up to the African Americans to decide how they feel. The right way for them to react is whatever way they choose to react. I personally do not believe that racism is in anyway right, and this Klan incident was terrible and wrong.
I think that Tim Wise was 100% accurate in his comments about how white people talk about race. White Americans are very often oblivious, just as he said. We do not live in a time of great racism and are therefore not accustom to racism and talking about it. Oblivious is a perfect word to describe white people and racism.
Brad Benghiat 2nd Hour

Anonymous said...

Ellie Toth
2nd hour
1. I think America today tends to be clueless when in comes to racial sensitibity because i think we are in a denial stage of racism. Since the 1600, when the slaves came over on ships from africa, things for racial equality have dramatically changed in the large picture;However, what most Americans don't see and maybe don't look for are the people who still won't hire the black person and the parents who don't want their daughter dating a black man. These people still exist today and there is not much we as America can do to change their opinions. So, i think that Americans are not so clueless to racism but more in denial that it does still exist and try our best to pretend those racist people do not exist. Some people do not understand the words they use of their actions can be more hurtful or racist then we think. Some are more sensitive about it than others and we have to keep in mind the words we choose or the actions we choose.
2. I think Tim Wise's comments are acurate for the most part of Americans not having to talk about racism and being in denial that it still exists;however, the comment about when racism comes up and Americans are in "la la land," about it doesn't seem acurate in the sense that most Americans have talked about it in their lifetime or in school and are not shocked to even hear it. We Americans are in denial but i think he takes it too far.

Anonymous said...

I dont think that white people are clueless, but rather it is like that story kids are told about the Emporor not wearing pants. In this version the kid who informs his fellow villagers about their emporor's fashion statement is gets outcast for thinking differently. In some places I beilve that if a joe shmoe where to claim that there is still rascism in his community, I think that white people would become extremely defensive. They dont want to think or have others think they could possibly racist so poor Joe will probibly be critisized and be outcasts by some. In order to stay with the crowed people might just accept the statement that racism is dead. I dont totally agree with what the man in the video said, because he was sort of saying that people dont ever think of racism. But white people do, every time they are with people who have different backrounds, the first thing one probibly notices are their differences. White people arent ignorant, their just in denial, instead of not knowing they want to forget. He also said that knowing about racism is like reading a book and black people have read more than white; while I think its really learned through expeirience, not just of racism but predjudices in general.
mark g. 2ns

Anonymous said...

Dustin Oakwood
3rd Hour
1. White America tends to be clueless about racial sensitivity; in my opinion, because we have never really been the target of social injustice. I believe my generation takes pride in our vast acceptance of race, gender, sexual orientation, etc. Maybe it is because of my diverse environment and accepting upbringing that I don’t see racism clearly. Racism in itself confuses me; the very concept of hating an entire group of people for no real reason doesn’t make rational sense. As for part B of this question, I believe we should listen to the offended group of black Americans. Why? Because only good can come from helping their claims. If we listen to the non-offended group then we are ignoring a group of upset Americans, that’s just morally incorrect.
2. I agree with Tim Wise’s statements about white Americans. I believe we are in our own little bubble. Completely ignorant to the racism out there like black American unemployment rates. White Americans only became concerned about the unemployment rates when their rates went up. As a new generation I believe we should put our focus on getting rid of the “invisible” racism in our environment. Now that I look back and reflect on my ignorance I feel like crap. Racism is not gone even if it seems like it is, it comes and gets us in subtle ways, like the unemployment rates, etc. We have not achieved complete social justice yet and this disturbs me.

Anonymous said...

(1) I think it seems that white America tends to be clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity because it is still a sensitive topic as a whole, so we deny racism all together. Racism is such a controversial topic and I think to avoid talking about it a lot of times people just act like it doesn’t exist. Sure, we may know it does, but I think that white Americans would rather just shove past all the tension and the sensitivity and ignore something. They might say, “If something isn’t broken, why fix it?” If there is no racism, why focus on it? Then no light is shed on racism, which postpones the disagreements, and it is just put on the back burner for a while. *I’m not denying racism, but I do think that this is what a lot of white Americans do, whether they know it or not. As for the responses to the Klan reenactment video, I think that it is up to you on what to think or who to listen to. If you shouldn’t think one thing because that’s what someone else is saying on something in general, why should a video about responses to racism be any different? (2) I think Tim Wise’s comment were accurate, but only to a certain extent. I agree that white people do live in somewhat of a bubble shielded from racism, but it’s not like whites aren’t aware of it. I think that sense we may not be affected by it as much directly we pretend it doesn’t exist, even though we know it does.
Elyse Dumas - 3rd hour

Anonymous said...

Liza Bondarenko
2nd hour
1. This is a definition of the racism from Longman Dictionary, “1 unfair treatment of people, or violence against them, because they belong to a different race from your own 2 the belief that different races of people have different characters and abilities, and that your own race is the best.” But usually when we speak about racism we think about how white America tends to be clueless. We think mostly about whites like about racists. First and main reason of it of course in our past and history. But some people believe that racism still alive, and that it is still a big problem, and there a lot of proves of this opinion. But the most interesting about this situation the reaction of the other side. For example different reaction of black people about the situation with students in KKK costumes at school. Some students were really upset after they’ve seen such scene at their school and they suppose that this is racism to do such things. But others think that this absolutely normal to do this kind of things at school and this good example of education, like another teacher who repeated that experiment. She is black and still she doesn’t think that that was wrong thing to do with her students. Also there are people who prefer not to talk about racism at all, just pretend that this problem does not exist.
2. Dared and rough. But there is a truth. If you are white it means that can don’t care about racism. It’s not a big problem for you. Unfortunately. But it’s our choice to be or not to be in "a bubble of obliviousness."

Anonymous said...

Hannah Grossman
2nd Hour

1.I think America today tends to be clueless about racial sensitivity because they just don't know. There are things that are okay to say or to do, but only to a certain extent. I believe some people don't realize that they are crossing the line. People say things or do things that may hurt others but the things they are doing aren't done on purpose. I believe this to be true because racism doesn't play a huge roll in a white Americans life. People are not always sure what is right and what is wrong. Although I think if you don't know if its right you shouldn't say anything. I think that the whole Klan thing was extremely wrong and it definitely should not have been in a school environment when there are kids of all different types of races. The teacher should have been more aware of her surroundings.

2. I believe that Tim Wise's comments were extremely accurate. Like I said before white people just don't know when they are crossing the line or when there not. He is right that racism does not face us nearly as much as it did back then. He also says that when it is sprung upon us, white people are not sure what to say and like he says they are "oblivious".

Anonymous said...

Michael Rondello
2nd Hour

1. Americans seem to be clueless about racism because they pretend like it doesn’t exist anymore because we have a black president or they don’t like to talk about it because it is awkward to them. If the reenactment of the KKK offends any black Americans then we should listen to them. If others don’t care but some do then it is a problem because of the people who care about it. It is a legitimate offense to the black community, so if there were those who weren’t offended it would be strange and it being a legit offense makes it so that we should listen to them. I am offended by this and the idea of reenacting the KKK in school is ridiculous anyways, so we should listen to the black community and those who are offended.
2. I think Tim Wise was very accurate in pointing out that the white Americans don’t really think about racism in their everyday lives. The only time I think about racism is talking about it at school. White Americans really don’t understand racism like the minority races do because of the lack of experience. I also believe that many Americans think racism is an awkward topic to discuss so they try to avoid it.

Anonymous said...

1. It seems that the white America tends to be clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity because there are many instances that we hear about that show that some white Americans are clueless. Although we hear about this, there are many more white Americans that are not clueless than ones who are clueless to racial sensitivity. We just don’t hear about the instances where white Americans are not clueless to racial sensitivity. Since this Klan reenactment offends most members of the black community, then I would listen to the majority because if there are only a small amount of people with a problem with this, I would still listen to those people because their voices matter too even if they are not the majority. It would be ignorant to ignore the complaints of these people because everybody’s viewpoint should be heard even if you do not agree wit what they are saying.
2. I agree with most of what Tim wise said about white Americans not realizing that racism is still occurring in many places today. I think that most of his comments are accurate. I don’t know if I agree with the fact that he said that the vast majority of white Americans have not been in a position where they had to think actively about racism. I think that most Americans have had to do this at one point in their lives. I have done this before. Although, there are still many white Americans who haven’t had to think about this, which should not be true because this problem should be talked about more often than it currently is.

Alex Valente
2nd Hour

Anonymous said...

Stefanie Kueck
3rd
1) I think that White Americans don’t see racial sensitivity because we are not the ones that have it coming to us. Some white Americans don’t have the little comments or glares or rejection of a job because of their race because they are viewed as someone who is powerful and strong and smart and sometimes even viewed as better than other races. I think that in the situation of the Klan reenactment we should listen to the views of the people that got hurt to solve the racial feelings that we have and also teach the ones that don’t know that when talking about racial things when to much may become a bigger problem then your classroom.
2) I think that he hit the points correctly that maybe white people are in fact in denial but maybe because they don’t want to talk about the fact that there is racial trouble in America because they are afraid of saying the wrong things so it is easier to just set it on the back burner and act like it is not there. This racial connection between whites and other races have been around for so many years I don’t think that you can just bring it up in one conversation and the whole situation will just be done and over with. I think Racism will probably always be around in some sort of way because of our history and that it will always be a touchy subject for people of all races

Anonymous said...

Allison Levine
3rd hour
1. I think that we should take all of these points seriously, because all have their own valid and legitimate arguments. To pick one point to listen to over the others, I would be in favor of those offended. It may be a giant misunderstanding and the media blowing this way out of proportion, but the teachers should have taken into consideration the reaction of people that would be around during the time they were going to do the project. Why keep something like this—an act from history which inflicted fear and cost the lives of many Americans—from the administration when it is such a touchy and sensitive topic? If these teachers kept this information to themselves, it makes you wonder and curious if there was really something else going on besides the project. Like the whole Watergate ordeal; when Nixon wouldn’t share his recorded conversations it just made everything seem much more suspicious. What if there was really something else going on and we ignored it or said that it’s the media trying to get attention? There could be serious debates, arguments, maybe even riots on how this event was completely shoved aside like it was no big deal. It’s much better to be safe than sorry.
2. I do not believe that what Time Wise is saying is correct. We have not been oblivious throughout history. We have been very aware of race and very protective of our own, trying to keep white separated from those of color. As well, we have to be conscious of what we say, for some people can make very hurtful and racist comments. Wise says, also, that these things come to us as a shock because we are off in “la la land”. The American people are shocked because of the event of teachers allowing students to reenact something involving the KKK; teaching kids that it’s okay to walk around in robes/sheets and act as Klan members. Yet, when we see on the news that someone of color was arrested, people don’t seem too shocked—that they were arrested because they’re accused of doing something just because they seemed “suspicious” based on the color of their skin; it almost seems normal to some. Today, there is still racism, but I would say much less than there was in previous generations, but the people are not oblivious to race. People are very aware but some do seem to act oblivious; trying to make it seem as though they are innocent and have nothing to do with racism.

Anonymous said...

Katlin Beal
6/2/10
3rd Hour
Actually I think, at least in our area, it seems that white people are getting better about the race sensitivity issue. But I think it’s mostly because now we do have a black president. This shows people that African Americans are equal to white Americans because now they have been to the top of the ladder in politics. This is also showing white people that they have to get a clue about the racial issues. I think this whole Georgia Klan rob mess is just a tempest in a teapot. This was blown entirely out of proportion. I think this could have been dealt with in the district so I choose to follow the 2nd group. If kids were actually knowingly trying to start something with the students they wouldn’t be saying it was a project they would have done it openly. Personally, I believe that Tim Wise is completely wrong to say that white people don’t know anything about black history. Racism does stem from ignorance but I do not believe that is the case here. Tim Wise said that it was almost like African Americans had read 400 pages and white people haven’t even read the preface but mainly I think this is really incorrect. This idea of mine may have come from all of the black history we have studied in school and how people our age have learned about racial sensitivity. Maybe the generation before us was ignorant to this sensitivity thing but I don’t believe our generation is.

Anonymous said...

Michele Snyder
3rd hour
1. At first I was just going to answer the question, that white America tends to be clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity because they aren’t as much of a victim as other races may be, and also because personally I believe that white America can be quite selfish at times. Selfishness shows up in this situation because white America is in denial knowing the sensitivity of racism and is just trying to let it pass by even though little things still occur today.
Then I looked at what other students have said on this matter, and after looking at Jim Stevens’ blog (3rd hour), Ellie Toth’s blog (2nd hour) and Drew’s blog. I realized I didn’t really think about the question very much. I’d have to agree with Jim that white America isn’t completely clueless, yes they may be when it comes to one matter or another, but they are definitely not clueless. Really, I think white America has taken racism just an extra step or two farther than other races, which makes them stand out more, with slavery for example. Slavery is just one example of how white America has done many horrible things to other races that has given white America a reputation that they don’t necessarily want to admit to or face the consequences for. And I’m not saying that white America isn’t a victim to racism, they definitely are, they just aren’t on the top of the list for victims since they are a little more extreme then other races may be.
I think we should listen to the side that is offended because we don’t want to have an up-set group Americans, as Dustin Oakwood (2nd hour) said but also the African Americans who ‘ignore’ it could be ignoring it to get more white people to accept African Americans. And I think you should listen to more than one side of a situation in all situations so that you can have more than one opinion/side/perspective to take the situation from.
2. I believe Tim Wise’s comments are accurate because white America has made a bad reputation for themselves and are making it worse by not talking about it or thinking about it because they try to forget it and don’t want to admit what they have done since they now realize it was bad and wrong and really just sad.
Or maybe some people don’t want to talk about it or think about it or anything simply because they realize other people find it wrong and sad and those people, who ignore it, ignore it because they don’t want to be proven incorrect, because, as I stated in question one, white America can be quite selfish.

Anonymous said...

Lea Martin
3rd hour

1. I think white America seems so clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity because white Americans don’t know how it is like to be discriminated. They never had this conflict about being “different”. The big picture about racism changed so that could be another reason white Americans are in denial. We don’t have slaves anymore and we don’t essentially treat black people differently when we talk to them or just around them. But there are still people out there who do not hire black people or people from different races. Just because they think white Americans have a better quality of working. I believe white people are not necessarily clueless but we are definitely in denial about the fact that racism still exists today, even though it’s not as harsh as it was years ago.
2. I think the comments Tim Wise made in this video are accurate for the most part about Americans not having to think or worry about being a different race and having fewer options, and the fact that racism is still in denial. However when he indicated that Americans don’t really know about it and know what’s going on with racism it doesn’t seem to be accurate. Most people learn and talk about it in school or in other places, so Americans do know about it.

Anonymous said...

1. It seems that white people are clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity because they never went through the things that black people went through. White people didn't have to here about the bad, racist stories from their grand parents. They didn't have to worry about going anywhere and being profiled. For example, when a black person walk into a store, that black person is always being watched. Or when a black person is stopped by a police, that person is searched all over. This is why white people are clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity.

I think the black people who didn't say anything about the Klan reenactment probably felt like the white people didn't know any better.



2.Yes, I think Tim Wise comments are accurate. I say this because if you think about it, white people never had to think or talk about racism. Like in the pass, white people weren't worrying about racism they were worrying about other things. Today when people talk about racism it do seem like some white people are caught off guard. This is why I think Tim Wise comments are accurate.


Acari White

Anonymous said...

Griffin Harms
3rd Hour
1.) I think that white America tends to be clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity because they have been the abuser of racial injustice, rather than the victim. Because of this, white America constantly fails to put themselves "in the shoes" of some minorities. I believe that white America could learn a lot about racial sensitivity by listening to members of the black community, because it is impossible for white people to feel the way black people do about the Klan.
2.) I feel that Tim Wise's comments are accurate because it is true that white Americans will never be in a position where they will have to take action about racism. The issue of racism is not a fairly new one, either, because it has been an issue that has not been acknowledged often in our history. I also believe that it is very accurate that he says that being white in America keeps you in a "bubble of obliviousness" because you are not prepared to talk about the aspects the issue of racism entails.

Anonymous said...

Willie Beattie
2nd Hour

1. White America tends to be clueless about racial sensitivity because they were never the ones in history that were targeted. White America was always either the racist people or just the “normal” skin colored people. You should listen to the people that are up set because some of the stuff that is. You should listen to them because no racism should ever be tolerated. We should all be able to see past skin color differences and get along. This would be the perfect outcome, but as you know, there will always be racism out there.
2. His comments are very accurate in my opinion. He is right when he says that white people never truly had a grasp on racism because, like he said, white Americans have been really oblivious to the experiences of people with color. Also, in history he said that white Americans viewed racism as not a big deal which is true considering that fact that we hurt people of color for so long before realizing it was wrong and we should really understand the magnitude of what we did and it’s effects it had, and still has and African Americans. We need to be more understanding about the topic of racism.

Anonymous said...

alex wong
2nd hour

If the black Americans in the United States than we must listen to the majority of the people. Of we only listen to the people who are out in the open then we will not be able to connect with the rest of the African American people. When there are people who let their stupidity out and not in the case of doing so purposefully than we must look at it as a mistake but of it is not from them being stupid than we must look at how much better and greater the offense is than it would be when done unintentionally and in either way we must be conscious of what African Americans think and less of what we think they think.

I think that Tim wise is correct for most of it but I don't agree with
Everything When he says we are in denial it true we are also wham he says we are absent when racism occurs is not totally true I think that people realize that it happens But do not comprehend the fact that it happens all the time Everywhere and that it it’s not just when you notice the problem does it occur.

Anonymous said...

Blake Jackson
3rd Hour
1. I think that white America is so clueless to racial sensitivity because they normally don’t have to face the type of racial tension that many other ethnicities do. White people are the majority in the country therefore they know that either way they have the power in the country. White people also don’t have to face the same insecurities that many of the other races do because they have never had their flaws pointed out to the them by the mass. While they may try to sympathize with the other races, they just don’t get it and they never will be able to. The truth is white people will never be black, Latino, or Asian. They will never have to face the problems that these groups have faced their whole life and continue to face on an everyday basis. Until they have been in the shoes of another ethnicity they will never understand. If the Klan reenactment offends most members of the black community, but others ignore it you should listen to those who are upset because those are the ones who will be bothered by your comments. If the other group ignores it then they really pose no problem to the rest of America.
2. I do agree with a lot of what he says because he makes a lot of sense. Many white people don’t have to deal with the same problems faced by colored people so they ignore it.

Anonymous said...

Austin Rovinski
2nd hour- Wickersham
6/3/10

1. I don’t think that white America is clueless to racial sensitivity; in fact, I believe that people are too racially sensitive. People are constantly in fear that they will offend some other minority and they have to make every move possible to be politically correct, and situations like this are an example of how people get outraged at something relatively minor in terms of acts of racism. I agree that students wearing Klan robes (sheets) through the school was a bad idea, but does it really deserve to make national news and cause so much controversy? This is an issue that should have stayed within the school district; it doesn’t need to go to national news due to the racially sensitive nature of it. Isn’t a student trying to burn down a school with a blowtorch and turpentine more interesting news than a teacher accidentally “promoting” racism? I believe that America’s fear of racial mistreatment is what causes them to cover these stories.
2. I do not agree with Tim Wise about “post-racialism”. Although white people don’t have to care about racism, they are well aware of it. We just might not respond to it as much as other minorities because we really aren’t the group being affected. I don’t believe that white people don’t focus any attention on racism, because then a story like this wouldn’t have made national news! I think that Tim Wise is addressing a small portion of white people and not the whole group.

Then again, I could be the one addressing the issue from a small portion, so my responses could not represent the majority. But if that’s the case, how do we know who’s in the majority and who’s not?

Anonymous said...

I think that the white America is clueless because there aren't very many "racist" against us. They may not like us, but they aren't racist. Our race as whites is the more dominant one, we're everywhere. White Americans see it as a threat to them because now the new face of America is black. They don't know how it feels to have people being racist towards them; so what they say or do in their eyes isn't wrong or hurtful. I.E. The teacher who let her students walk around in KKK "robes or sheets" obviously was dumb enough to think that she wouldn't offend anyone, but also didn't know how it would feel and she would have had to been in the people of colors' shoes to know how it felt. The part of the black race that should be listened to is the part that is offended and hurt by these racist gestures made by there surroundings. There is no way that someone doesn't care when people are against them and there race. I mean it's not like a rumor or something that isn't true so they can just brush it off. The part of the black race who don't "care", just don't want to do anything about it. They are probably tired of having to stand up for themselves so they just don't say anything anymore. I think some of his comments are accurate, but a majority are stupid and seems like he just pulled them out of the air. White people aren't oblivious to racism. Yes, it is a weird and awkward topic to talk about, but if it came down to it I'm sure they'd be able to talk about it.

Sandra T

Anonymous said...

Brandon Verona
3rd Hour
1)I think that white America is oblivious to the fact that there is racism still and there will be until we realize it, because we (as whites) don't always realize when we say something that offends African Americans. For example the incident with the KKK this last month is a great example. The teacher knew that the KKK were wrong but she didnt put it together that that is not a good thing to reinact on school property or really anywhere. She should have known that it is not a smart idea to have her children walk around in the robes even if there were "spongebob party hats" under thier hoods.
2)I share the same thoughts that Tim Wise has. He says that we are oblivious to the experiences that blacks have had. he says our heads are in another place because we dont have the experience of dealing with racism. Also i think he is right when he says that people have never really focused on the fact that we still are today raciest.

Anonymous said...

1. White Americas tend to be clueless when it comes to racial sensitivity because they do not have to feel the racial tension. We haven’t had to feel it because the majority of the population. They have heard about the injustice, but some of them haven’t experienced it. In the media, discriminatory humor is common. But to someone who has experienced that discrimination in real life, it may not be as funny. If this Klan reenactment offends people, it should be addressed. I do not think that the intentions of the project were to offend people, but to inform people. This is an important variable to think about. I do not understand how the teacher thought that this was okay. It is important to listen to all the different opinions.
2. I agree with Tim Wise in the video, that we have had to act on something involving racism. In this day and age, it seems that we are past racism, but we have not fully healed. People in the 60s thought that as well, but we now know that wasn’t the case, and racism was still going on. In twenty or forty years from now, people well be thinking the same thing about our time. Also many of us haven’t been in a position where we had to act on it, so we never needed to think about it. This is when people start to believe that it isn’t their problem.

Randi G

Anonymous said...

Kierra W.
2nd


1. As of being a person of African American ethinicity, I believe that most white individuals tend to be clueless to Racism, or sensitivity because they
choose to ignore it and pretend that it only occured in the past when it is clear to see that it still exist today even with an African American President.
Their is a majority of white individual who believe they live in a Utopic where there is no racism,or sensitivity due to lack of knowledge of these
subjects or never undergoing/witnessing racial attacks. We live in a modern world now and it is plain to see that not only African American ethnicities are
still degraded and stereotyped too but other races,as well. Many individuals, are afraid to speak up in stop this possible Ku Klux Klan uprise,
especially white individuals.They are afraid to speak up because they have no experience of the subject and are afraid of making things worse.
This simple fact makes Black idividuals believe talking to white individuals will not solve anything. Some believe their is nothing they will be able to
do since Racism has been around for centuries, and are nation was even started by it. But if we all fail to let a thing like this pass we will start a
open gate for more racial acts to come;these K.k.k reenactments and earler Jina six acts could be test.

I agree very much with the Tim wise from the video, he explined clearly and statements were accurate. We still have indiviuals especially white who believe
they are in lala land and are oblivious to Racism. Some white individuals lack knowledge of racism and still believe that Black individuals have the same
equal oppurtunities as blacks, even back then in history. Also, most individuals choose not to talk about it and ignore Racism around black people because
they have unaccurate knowledge about it which makes them feel uncomftorable when they do talk about it.

Anonymous said...

White Americans are clueless about racial sensitivity because most white people don't live it everyday. White people generally live,work, or go to school in areas where they feel most comfortable in, and that is with other "white" people. Depending on the type of person you are and where you grew up really defines your sensitivity. Myself growing up went to dps for 2 years which is mainly black people, I didn't feel any racial sensitivity because I was a little kid being clueless to the fact that it existed. Most humans feel most comfortable in their own "ethnicity". Just like why do mostly whites live in birmingham?whereas mostly blacks and caldeans live in warren?
It really depends on everyone's opinion and their sensitivity. Some blacks probably don't respond to it because some may think "Oh, well thats no where near me, why should i care?" whereas other blacks jump up and say "hey, thats not right" You should really listen to your own opinion and not the opinion of the media, or anyone else's voice but your own, even though it may not be the right one.
Tim Wise is 100% right that white people don't think much about racial sensitivity because white people since the beginning have thought they were on top being "big and bad" putting blacks through slavery, thinking their better, etc. so white people don't think they are the inferior, when really racism(with color) started, because white people started it, not with just blacks, but all the way back when they discovered native americans.
Lauren Sikorski