Thursday, April 10, 2008

Blog #18 - D.I.Y. Blog - Git 'Er Done!

(Before we begin, I must say that I have been highly impressed with the quality of the thinking and the depth of analysis that has gone into the questions. I am especially impressed by the students who I am working w/ for the first time this semester - wrapping your head around these blog questions can be a little tricky sometimes. Well done, and keep up the good work!)

During this Civil Rights and Women's Rights movements unit, we've seen a lot of injustice and been witness to tremendous acts of courage and bravery. I think that there are still many questions left unanswered, so I decided to let you guys ask the questions for a change.

1. Do you think that affirmative action is good or bad for America? - Tyler F., Phil,

2. If Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama were competing for different political parties instead of the same party, who do you think would win the national election for the presidency? Why? - Alyssa T.

3. If you were Fannie Lou Hamer, would you feel that registering to vote was worth all the hassle after? - Derek M., Raekeshia,

4. What if Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King were alive today?

  • How would they react to today's tragedies like Hurricane Katrina?


  • How would the world be different today if they were alive? - Jake C.


  • Which one's tactics/philosophy would you join today? - Kelsey

5. Do you think the things that Senator Obama said in his speech about distractions from the real problems that face America is true or not? Why? - John C.

6. Why do you think someone so unimportant to politics like Bill Russell (or other sports figures in today's world) can have such a big social/cultural impact on America? - Matt Bergin

7. How could the response to Hurricane Katrina have been improved? - Jourdan, Jessica, Jason S., Paul, Carleigh, Ian,

8. Do you think we would be closer to energy independence and newer forms of alternative fuel if if Al Gore had won the election in 2000 instead of George W. Bush? - Tyler H.



9. Which do you think had a bigger impact on the country and why: the Civil Rights or the women's rights movement? - Rob S., Robbie L.,


10.If you were a leader of the Civil Rights Movement back then, would you be a leader more like Dr. King or more like Malcolm X with regard to philosophy and tactics (non-violence vs. by self-defense / convert the opponent vs. black power and nationalism)? Or would you be something completely different? Why? - Stefan, Stefanos, Amber


11. Why is it taking so long to rebuild and repair New Orleans? - Nick



12. How would life be different for women if the E.R.A. amendment had been passed? - Matt Bajorek, Raffi



13. Why did the Bush administration take so long to get down to New Orleans after Katrina? - Ashley D., Alex D., Bethany, Raffi, Ian, Raekeshia, Stefanos,

14. Has women's advancement during the past 40-50 years hurt or helped men? Why? - Nikita

15. Women have always had difficulty with gaining equality and respect from men. So, why would some women dress scantily and only care about their looks to attract men? If women truly wanted to be better, why act dumb and do nothing? - Emma


16. Why do you think women in the 1950s were so dissatisfied with living "the ideal life" as a housewife? - Mollie, Tommy


17. In your opinion, would the appearance of the current female image of "beauty" have changed if pop culture sensation Twiggy not been discovered? Why or why not? - Angelina, Gina


18. Will discrimination ever be over in the future? - Audrey


19. Even though V.P. Al Gore had won the popular vote in the 2000 election, he lost the electoral vote to Governor George Bush. Do you agree that the current voting system we have is o.k. (with the electoral college) or should it be reformed to something else? - Paul


20. Was the non-violent protest method the best way to fight Jim Crow and establish Civil Rights? Why or why not? - Bethany, Sarah, Raffi, Ryan, Marin, Christy, - (It may be easy to judge this in retrospect since it worked, but would a self-defense strategy have worked faster or provoked a more violent reaction from a very racist, resistant South? - the editor)


21. Pretend you didn't know the outcome of the Children's March: would you have taken a stand with the other kids of Birmingham, AL in May of 1963? Why or why not? - Lydia, Angelina, Bethany, Sarah, Kelsey, Ally R., Amber



22. If you were 18 this year, who would you have voted for in each of the primaries and why? - Robert G.


23. If you had lived in New Orleans or in the Gulf Coast region in late August 2005 and Hurricane Katrina was bearing down on the area (pretending you don't know the aftermath, of course), would you have evacuated or stuck it out? Why? Why do you think so many people who could leave stayed? - Sarah


24. Who do you think was the most influential woman in the women's movement? Why? (here's a link to help you with your decision - http://www.legacy98.org/move-hist.html )- Ben, Ally R.


25. Were there parts of Senator Obama's speech of March 2008 that you agreed / disagreed with? Why? - many people asked this question in several different ways.


26. The children of Birmingham, AL marched for freedom. Despite being jailed, their attempts eventually worked, and things became integrated in the South. Many people think that kids can't change history even though here is at least one example that proves them wrong. What would students / teenagers today march for and feel strongly enough to fight for (and maybe even be willing to go to jail in protest)? - Katie B.


27. Do you think you would have urged your state representative to vote for the E.R.A. Amendment back in the 1970s or would you have worked w/ Phyllis Schlafly to defeat the amendment? Why? - Christy


28. How can you try someone for a crime in 2005 that he/she might have committed in 1964 like with the Mississippi Burning case? - Emily C.


29. Why did it take so long for President Kennedy to react to the racism going on in his own country back in the early 1960s? - Lorne


30. How do you think sexual independence has changed women's roles in society today? (Others have asked similar questions about the Pill or Helen Gurley Brown's book, Sex and the Single Girl) - Claire, Tommy


31. What do you think the "proper shape" is for men and women today? - Ryan B.


Pick any one of these questions and answer it fully. You may NOT pick your own blog. Minimum word reply is 200 words.
Due Monday, April 14th, 2008.

55 comments:

Anonymous said...

(I liked Alyssa’s question……I hope I get a good grade for this!)

I think that if Hilary Clinton and Barack Obama were going head to head for the presidency that Obama would win. I’m not just saying that because I like Obama but for these reasons: 1) He has integrity; I think he is someone we could trust to take care of our country. 2) He is the only candidate that thinks of everyone and not only himself; for e.g. all the other candidates would say ‘I can make America a better place’ but Obama would say ‘We can make American a better place’ …his campaign theme is “ Yes we can”.
3) Obama also has the ability to move this country forward; he may have his work cut out for him but, I think he is capable of taking the country out of the abyss that we’re in and protect the future. 4) He has the gift to inspire; He is the type of person that makes you see anything is possible. Other black candidates have tried and he is the only one to make it this far (in terms of how close he is to be the democratic candidate). 5) Barack can bring change, show change; in fact I think he is change personified.

Nikita C
4th

Anonymous said...

If I was a leader of the Civil Rights Movement, I would be more like Martin Luther King than Malcolm X for many reasons. The reason is because Martin Luther King’s approach to how to handle the movement was much more intelligent, and had a greater chance for success. One reason that the approach had a greater chance for success was because while Martin Luther King just wanted the African Americans to have equal rights as the Whites, Malcolm X wanted to over power the Whites. Now think about that for a minute!!! Would the Whites be more likely to accept Blacks as equal or let the Blacks over power them and make themselves (the whites) the minority. Malcolm X also supported violence, which led to fear by the White community, while Martin Luther King was a supporter of non-violence. Comparing their policies on violence and equality vs. overpowering, Martin Luther King’s approach would be the ones most accepted by whites. But the fact is Martin Luther King was also liked by blacks more (or so it appears) than Malcolm X. The riots after Martin Luther King’s assassination showed his importance to the black community, while after Malcolm X’s assassination, there was not as much anger. So to me, MLK had the better policies and was liked more, and being the leader most liked would give him a higher change of success.

Jacob Trunsky
4th hour

Anonymous said...

1) Quite easily, I would say that Affirmative Action is good for America. All people should be allowed the same rights. Giving one type of person more rights than another is wrong. If someone is a different race than you, it doesn’t mean you are inferior. It simply means that they look different than you. Besides the fact that its unfair to be judged on race, the constitution said that all men are created equal. If that’s true, than what right would anyone have to hold one back because of race. Thankfully, they made Affirmative Action. Since minorities can now have they same opportunities as others, we can now see two main benefits. One, is that we can now see what others can do. Since, say, African Americans can now play sports with the same supplies/support as others we can see that they can be just as good as us (sometimes better). Now we see what makes each type of person special. That brings the world closer together; which brings me to the second benefit. Now that all are given equal opportunities, we can all get along better. Yes, some people will still be racist, and yes, some will still be bitter about the past. However, many people will be happy to look forward to the future and can get along with others. While that may not be definite proof, if people are treated equal, they will be happier, and will be on better terms with others.

Rob Salton
4th

Anonymous said...

21. Pretend you didn't know the outcome of the Children's March: would you have taken a stand with the other kids of Birmingham, AL in May of 1963? Why or why not?

If I was a black child during the time the Children's March happened, I would have been one of the first ones at the march. Imagine watching your people be unfairly beaten, fired, separated from the rest of society. Also, imagine watching people like Martin Luther King, Malcom X, Rosa Parks, and other strong black activists, wouldn't anyone feel tempted or even feel like they need to do the march. This was the chance for so many black children to take part in the activism their role models do and take part in the civil rights movement. Whether I knew the outcome or not, I would have been glad to participate in the movement. If anything, getting arrested would make me feel more tempted because watching Dr. King get arrested for his cause was effective in proving a point and having children arrested would prove a big point to the rest of the nation. When the nation would see videos and hear news of black kids getting arrested, having dogs attack them, and being hosed down would create more reaction and movement than if there was a peaceful march, ignored by the government and people. This march was such a big part of our history and even as a white person, I feel like it would have been a great thing to be a part of and an accomplishing feeling to be part of a movement that was s important and help shape the world.

Anonymous said...

Emily Corless
2nd Hour

7. How could the response to Hurricane Katrina have been improved?

The response to Hurricane Katrina could have been greatly improved. It took days before the government responded and took the initiatives to help. One mistake the government made was having all of the National Guards men in Iraq. The government should have kept a least half of the National Guards men in the US just in case there was an emergency. The government should have had an emergency hurricane evacuation plan. This plan would have instructed the government how to evacuate people and where to place the people after they have been rescued. More money should have been put into the levees to make them stronger. If the levees would have been stronger, they would have stopped most of the city from being flooded. Food and water should have been sent to the Convention Center and Superdome. People were starving, dehydrated, ill, and scared. The food and water could have saved peoples’ lives. The government should have had rescue crews out after the storm had passed. At the Convention Center and Superdome there should have been medical ad for those who needed it. The medical ad would have saved hundreds of lives. The government should have started evacuating people from the Convention Center and Superdome right away. The buses arrived on the Thursday September 1 when on Monday August 29 there was already 20,000 people at the Superdome. The government should have sent out a mandatory evacuation early, the people were not even given two full days to evacuate.

Anonymous said...

7) The response to Katrina could have been better than when it really happened. The communication between FEMA, and other organizations was really bad. If it took almost a week to find out that they were needed in New Orleans then there was some problem with how they got their information. I’m not trying to blame FEMA for them being late. Other people could of also told them that they were needed. Like the president. He flew over New Orleans a few days after but didn’t go down there till a week later to see what could be done. I knew he thought the situation was bad when he first flew over but still to come a week later to help was bad. People were dying, homes were being destroyed, and living situations and space was become hard. They eventually started throwing people out of the building that were either dead or in the way. If groups like FEMA got there sooner or the president then things like that wouldn’t of happened. Overall to make communications better people should of called them and said we need help. If they couldn’t then people around the area could of called them and said they needed help.
Nick Theisen
4th hour

Anonymous said...

Discrimination has been a big problem in the world for a long time. There has been discrimination against Women, Blacks, Native Americans, and many more races. Each case with a different story, whether there was a movement, a rough time, or a victory that doesn’t really feel like a victory. But no doubt there has been lots of discrimination. But now the question is Will discrimination ever be over in the future? I think that discrimination will not be over for a long time to come, because will always be a time when some people don’t like other people for some reason, sometimes people will put blame on others, and many other types of discrimination. There will always be discrimination or hatred to other people because hatred is basically human nature. People will dislike things and sometimes it will be other people. The discrimination won’t be as bad as it was in the past but it will still hurt. I also think that media has played a big role in past examples of discrimination and will continue to play a big role in discrimination. Because the media shows different things at different times, and sometimes peoples opinions will be influenced by the media and how famous or important people react to discrimination. So I do think that discrimination will not end in the future and it is a very serious matter that has to be addressed.

Maher Abou-Rass
4th Hour

Anonymous said...

If you were a leader of the Civil Rights Movement back then, would you be a leader more like Dr. King or more like Malcolm X with regard to philosophy and tactics (non-violence vs. by self-defense / convert the opponent vs. black power and nationalism)? Or would you be something completely different? Why

If I were a black activist back then, I would have been more like Malcolm X and supported self defense. It was tough for blacks back then and when they were being treated unfairly or being attacked by the police, they had every reason to fight back. No one was helping them. As a black American I would have been frustrated and would have encouraged other blacks to defend themselves when they were attacked. The police are there to enforce the law, not break it, and that wasn’t what was happening. All Africans should have had someone sort of weapon in the pocket to protect themselves. Being nonviolent like Martin Luther King Jr. was effective but many people were being hurt or killed by racists and no one was doing anything about it. Segregation was really bad back then and it was dangerous for blacks to speak up. There might have been more Marchers if they were allowed to protect themselves from the racists. Marchers were afraid because they or their family would be attacked and possibly even killed. They could do nothing about it. The many riots around the country had just as much impact as the nonviolence movement by Martin Luther King. The riots were physical proof that something needed to be done about segregation. I believe the issue of Civil Rights got more media attention when there was a riot. This is why I would act like Malcolm X instead of Martin Luther King if I were an African leader at that time.
robert g 5th

Anonymous said...

(Question 26) The children of Birmingham Alabama marched for equal rights and integration. This isn’t the only time in history children have made a difference in changing unfair policies and happenings in the United States. Children walked alongside Mother Jones in the march of mill children, where over ten thousand children marched for shorter hours, better pay, all of these which would help the families so kids wouldn’t have to work. Kids have changed history and should continue to. This is our country too, we will one day be the adults in this world, and we should have a say in how we are going to live. I think that teenagers and even younger children should take an interest in what is going on in the world. If we all united for what we believe in we CAN make the world a better place. Every year I and many other teens walk in the crop walk, which helps feed the hungry. If we could all come together for causes that benefit numerous people we could do a lot in the world. There are many causes that we should “march for”. We could march for better funding for schools, for factories to stop polluting, for hunger, for aids, and many numerous other causes. I firmly believe that we could make a difference, or at least raise awareness for the flaws and hardships in our country and the world.
Kelsey Kaline
5th hr

Anonymous said...

I think that if i was one of the African-American kids during the Children's March I would have without a question taken a stand with the other kids of Birmingham, AL in May of 1963. I feel this way because African Americans were trying to fight for there freedom, i believe that if i was in there position i would do anything and everything i can do to be treated equally. I don't think I could have handled being treated the way the african-americans were treated during that time period. They were treated so brutal and terribly I don't even know that I could imagine how they dealt with everything. African-Americans such as Rosa Parks, Malcolm X and MLK by understanding the information that I could, it would inspire and motivate me into fighting for what is right. If i was to get arrested during that march, I would've looked as it like what we were doing was actually beginning to overpower the white society. Getting arrested would have only made me feel like maybe this time it's finally starting to work to prove the nation that it is time to all be equal. Although we face similar issues today, I would have to imagine that anyone would have fought for there freedom. How the african-americans allowed the whites to treat them like that is still something I question today. I think it takes a lot of courage and strength to be able to be a African-American overcoming the fight for freedom in 1963. Because the Children's March is such an inspiring moment in history, being involved in that March would make me feel that I did a truly great thing and hoped to open many new opportunities for every African-American to come.

Melanie Shaw
4th hour

Anonymous said...

There are many reasons why it is taking so long to rebuild and repair New Orleans. The root of the problem is the population demographics before Katrina. 67% of New Orleans’ population before the catastrophe was black and were poor working citizens or on welfare. Many lived in rental houses or in public subsidized housing. They have nothing to go back to. Many of the rental homes or subsidized apartments they had lived in have now been torn down and despite protests, will not be rebuilt. The white population which was 28% before Katrina has done better but the entire population of New Orleans is down considerably.
My mother is from New Orleans and has many friends who still live there. They say the reason many of the home owners haven’t come back to rebuild is completely economic. The insurance companies haven’t wanted to pay for the damages and federal funding hasn’t been received. People are also worried about the strength of the levees and don’t want to rebuild if the system could fail again. When people come back to rebuild, they have no place to live except in cramped FEMA trailers or in very expensive housing. Their jobs no longer exist and new ones are not available. Also, they are also afraid of the crime in the city. Many of the people that stayed were just waiting for the city to be vulnerable so they could continue to easily commit crimes.
Tourism has always been the major source of jobs in New Orleans. Without jobs in hotels, services, restaurants, etc., the city has suffered. Many of these businesses can’t find housing for their workers or can’t afford to rebuild. If New Orleans was an industrial city or a city that housed great financial institutions such as Wall Street in New York, the Federal Government would be helping more. They surely came to the aid of the families who were devastated by the attack on the Twin Towers in New York and recently came to the aid of the people who were displaced by the fires in California. I believe they just don’t think a Southern city like New Orleans which is known for good food, good music, beauty, and European charm is worth the money to save. My mother says that the people of New Orleans have great respect for every ethnic group which has contributed to the culture in South Louisiana and without these people living in the city, it will never be the same.

Megan k.
4th hour

Anonymous said...

31. What’s the proper shape? Well, T.V, Movies, Magazines, and music, all sum up the same thing. Beauty is skin deep. But if that skin were to change its appearance, size, color, and break away from the underweight, tall and socially acceptable model, would it still have a place? From an optimistic stand point, all shapes are acceptable. However, morally speaking, there not. The Idea of the Ideal shape for anyone would be flawless skin, smooth silky hair, and a perfectly chiseled body. But let’s face it; none of us are truly perfect. The pages we see in magazines, the images of picture perfect teens and adults alike that we see on television or in major motion pictures, are a glossed over made up fantasy that none of us will ever truly be. Sorry to crush all of the hopeful teenyboppers dreams but we are all different. Our sizes and shapes make us different. They make us who we are. But the differences we see on the outside are nothing compared to what’s inside. America’s all “American” teen is beautiful, sexy, and classy; has high morals yet fits in perfectly with the “in” crowd. The “perfect” American teen is never late for dinner, finishes their homework on time, has high, outstanding grades, great friends and is any parent’s dream come true. Unfortunately none of America’s teens can fully meet this high quota but instead feels left out and poorly about them self because deep down we know that no one can reach this, but we still like to dream. Stay positive. The “proper” shape today should not be based on the appearance of the Perfect, all American Teen. It should be based on the shapes and characteristics and flaws of all of the people across the United States and the World. The proper shape should not only be the 5”8 120 model that lives in the perfect dream world, but it should also include the muscular jock, the scrawny nerd, the fearful Goth kid, and the ever ready humanitarian. The “proper shape” is all of us; it’s just that sometimes, it takes a little longer for each of us to really figure it out.
-Angelina Bertoni
5th Hour

Anonymous said...

I believe that actors or sports figures could have such a big social and cultural impact on America for a few reasons. First off, many people like children or grown men and women look up to athletes and actors all the time. The things that people sometimes do come from things that athletes or actors do. Athletes for instance are good at what they do and kids everywhere envy them and want to grow up to be just like them. I think it’s easy for athletes to make a huge social or cultural impact on America. Like Bill Russell, from the Boston Celtics. He won eleven championships with the team but he was appreciated from the fans and the city because of the color of his skin. Russell disliked the city of Boston and was hurt night in and night out. In the papers he wasn’t given credit for the teams win, and when fans would ask him for an autograph he would say no and take the time to get to know the person. Anything a famous person says is heard all over, and if they say that they support something then many other people could take interest in the same thing.

Stefanos T. 2nd Hour

Anonymous said...

Question 2

If Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama were running against each other for President instead of against each other within the same political party for the pary nomination, I think Barack Obama would win.
The first point is change. Both candidates focus on change, but do people really like change? I think people would not want Hillary in office because she is a woman. The U.S. has never had a women president and that would be change and people don’t respond well to change. In tough situations like war or terrorism, people tend to view a man as the stronger sex, able to deal that pressure without emotion. Hillary might not be able to handle it. Many Americans cringe at another four years of Hillary’s husband, former President Bill Clinton, back in the White house. On the other hand, the U.S. has never had a black president and that would be change as well, but I think since Barack is a man it’s different.
Second point is the candidates opposing views on troop withdraw. Hillary wants to take the troops out of Iraq as soon as she gets in office to appease the anti-war mongers. However, if Barack wins, he favors a slow troop withdraw which would allow the Iraqi government to stabilize appealing to the half.
Those are the reasons that I think that Barack Obama would win the presidency over Hillary Clinton, if they were running against each other in different political parties.

Andrew Littlefield
5th Hour

Anonymous said...

23) If I did not know the aftermath of the 2005 Hurricane Katrina, I would definitely have evacuated. If I had the resources to pick up and leave by car or some other form of transportation, I would have left as soon as the first warnings about a hurricane came in. I would not risk my family’s life from something that was preventable. I think that the people that had the means of transportation out of the city but stayed anyways were crazy. I understand that there is a lot of history in that city, and that many of the people living there had memories in those houses. Would it really be worth it to risk your own life because of this though? The memories and history were going to be demolished in the destruction that the water brought on anyway. I understand that some people had to stay because they didn’t have a way to leave, or they had to stay because of medication or other things that physically kept them from leaving. This just makes me more frustrated with the people that didn’t leave. They could have used their cars that they weren’t using to get people that wanted to leave out of the city.

Katie Bromley 2nd hour

Anonymous said...

I think that affirmative action is not a good idea for America. First of all, it is already very hard to get into college. There is serious competition for the limited number of spots that colleges and universities offer. People may think affirmative action is helping to provide equal opportunities for students of all races, and in some ways it is; however it is also questionable. The problem with affirmative action is that sometimes students who are more deserving of the coveted spot are denied because they will not bring diversity to the school, while a less deserving person will be accepted because they are of different ethnicity. American colleges should be less concerned about the race, gender and ethnicity of its students and more about academics. This is not saying that everyone shouldn’t get an equal chance. Some students are more privileged than others and have better schooling systems, which makes it harder for the less privileged to get into college. Although affirmative action does have its high points, it is mostly unfair to non-minorities who work just as hard and aren’t even considered. To make my point, I believe that everyone should have an equal shot at getting into college, and shouldn’t be judged by their ethnic background, but by their hard work and dedication to academics.
Claire Hayes
2nd hour

Anonymous said...

Pretend you did not know the outcome of the Children's March: would you have taken a stand with the other kids of Birmingham, AL in May of 1963? Why or why not? If I was an African American child living in Birmingham Alabama in May of 1963 I would have marched in the children’s march because I would have wanted to show my support for equal rights between whites and blacks. I also would have because the more people there are the more powerful the march could have been and every person counts. I also think it would have been fun to march along side my friends and family for an important cause. I am almost sure that my parents would not have wanted me to go but I still would have gone. I wish that I could have been there so that I could have proudly marched threw the streets of Birmingham with all of the other children. Marching in such an event as this would have been one moment in my life that I am most proud of because I know that I was making a huge difference for many people and many generations to come. Marching in the children’s march would have been something that I would have never forgotten for the rest of my life.

Tyler Howe 2nd hr

Anonymous said...

7. How could the response to Hurricane Katrina have been improved? - Jourdan, Jessica, Jason S., Paul, Carleigh, Ian

The response to Hurricane Katrina could have been improved in many different areas. To start with preparation, everyone knew that something like this could happen, but no one made a plan for if it did happen. There should have been some sort of plan to get everyone out and if people weren’t out, then somewhere for them to go. The situation would have been improved drastically if there was much more first aid help and if there were police officers and fire fighters on boats going around to rescue people from their homes. The other thing that was wrong with the picture in New Orleans is where were all of the buses that were supposed to be evacuating people from the city? They apparently came late, and people lost their lives because of that. The city and the bus companies needed a plan to get those buses into town ASAP. It sounds obvious and an easy task, but no one was in New Orleans on time after the hurricane was over, people needed help. If the Coast Guard was there right after the hurricane struck then the number of deaths would have been much lower because the rescues would have been in process right from the start.

Derek M.
5th Hour

Anonymous said...

Question 1
Affirmative action is bad for America. It is bad because though it has good intentions it just seems to turn racism around against white people. I agree that thirty to forty years ago blacks did not get treated the same as white people but now they are treated a lot better. Though racism is still a big problem in America, it is nowhere near as bad as it was in the 1960s. If a white person and a black person have the same GPA, the same ACT and SAT scores, and the black person is accepted to the university but the white person is not, that just seems racist towards white people. Like people should have known in the sixties, people cannot control if they are black, but when someone is trying to get into college they cannot control the fact that they are white. Choosing a black person instead of a white person just because he is black seems like the same thing white people did to black people on a much smaller scale, but nonetheless it is still inequality. When applying to college you should not have to show what your race is. If your ethnicity is completely unknown they cannot accept or decline you because of your race.

Matt Bergin
4th Hour

Anonymous said...

7. How could the response to Hurricane Katrina have been improved?

The response to Hurricane Katrina could have been improved a lot. There was much warning of a hurricane and the mayor didn’t have the city prepared. Every situation is different, just because last time a mandatory evacuation was issued and there was no hurricane, doesn’t mean that there wouldn’t be one for sure that time. If he had issued the mandatory evacuation earlier when he first heard of the hurricane, more lives would have been saved. Also if the buses were used to pick up people from their homes who couldn’t physically get to the superdome, would have helped a lot. The mayor claimed that even if the buses were above ground and useable, there wouldn’t be enough bus drivers to drive them. Whose fault is that? It was the mayor’s fault. But it wasn’t only the mayor’s fault; the government didn’t give much help either. They came in New Orleans days after the hurricane. The National Guard was the biggest help of all, and they came on their own. Much of the help that was needed was in Iraq, Bush had made a great majority go to Iraq and little stay in the U.S. and that little didn’t help at all. That time, New Orleans needed this help, and no one was giving it. People were left in that superdome for days, no food, no water, and no air conditioning. People were getting sick and dying. The children had to experience this happening. Everything had just gone wrong and America was wondering why did this have to happen and why didn’t we prevent this. It was a matter of who was in charge that didn’t take the responsibility of keeping New Orleans safe.

jourdan g 4th hr

Anonymous said...

15. Women have always had difficulty with gaining equality and respect from men. So, why would some women dress scantily and only care about their looks to attract men? If women truly wanted to be better, why act dumb and do nothing? – Emma. This really made me think If you want equality and respect you should go about it in the right way. The way some women tried to do this in the 50’s and 60’s was the wrong way. In my opinion acting dumb will definitely get you less respect. Same with the way they used to dress and their obsession with their outer appearance. Sure it may get them some attention but that brings them right back to where they began, the stereotype that the housewife is dumb, dresses a certain way and their only jobs in life are to cook, clean, and take care of kids not bringing any money into the house whatsoever. If women actually wanted to gain respect and equality from men they should go out in the world and do it or at least try. What the women of the time did was not try but the complete opposite. Even though it may have been hard for women to get jobs at the time it does not stop them from trying to break the stereotype of the common housewife.
Marin Haffey
5th hour

Anonymous said...

I have many different thoughts pop into my mind when trying to find an answer to; Will discrimination ever be over in the future? I feel that we need good leadership to overcome parts of discrimination and certain actions that people do that represents discrimination. I feel that even with great leadership and a powerful president there will still be some sort of discrimination in the world. Unfortunately, that is not what I want nor many other people but I know that many people have trouble dealing with the complete disrespect for different races that occurred in the past and many will never let that go. Black and whites will not forget what our ancestors fought for and even died for. The civil war can not be erased nor forgotten and people will always remember that there ancestors died fighting to either stop slavery and complete discrimination or fought to keep the blacks and whites separate and keep discrimination in affect. People can not forget the past and will always have some sort of discrimination either if its whites not liking the blacks or the blacks not liking the whites. There will, unfortunately, always be some sort of discrimination in effect.

Ryan Bertrand Hour 2

Anonymous said...

9. I think the civil rights movement had a bigger impact then women’s movement. I feel this way because during the civil rights movement the blacks were going against the ways of society at that time. They had to deal with racism and being attacked during peaceful protests and throughout it all deal with the assassination and murder of leaders like MLK, Malcolm X, and Huey Newton. Though I believe it has been tougher for women to gain rights I still feel the Civil Rights Movement had a larger impact. During the women’s movement nothing this catastrophic had happened to them during their movement unlike what happened to the blacks. I also feel the civil rights movement accomplished more than the women’s movement as well. During that short time frame they had multiple acts were passed to make it better for blacks today. Overall compared to the women’s rights movement the civil rights movement accomplished more but I fell it was for a higher price than the women had to pay. Blacks risked their lives, families and economic welfare doing protest and rallies. But the women during their movement didn’t have to pay such high prices. Finally, I feel that the civil rights movements had a bigger impact then the women’s rights movement.
Raphael Egziabher
5th hour

Anonymous said...

22. If you were 18 this year, who would you have voted for in each of the primaries and why?

If I were 18 this year I would vote for Barack Obama in the Democratic Primary and Ron Paul in the Republican Primary (he’s out of the race now put I would have been able to vote for him in Michigan).

I would vote for Barack Obama mainly to oppose Hilary Clinton. I disagree with her on many issues and don’t think she would make a good president. She wants universal health which I think would be very bad for America. Though it does make sure everyone receives health care, it also dramatically decreases the quality of care. People will also be paying higher taxes for care they might not necessarily receive. In England, a country with universal health care, people have to wait hours to receive care. Seeing a doctor is no longer as simple as making a phone call and scheduling an appointment. She also supports the death penalty which I believe is very wrong. The government should never be able kill its own citizens as a punishment.

I would vote for Ron Paul to support the idea he stands for. Though he has almost no chance at winning a general election, he is the only reasonable candidate running for a major party. He believes in restraining for preemptive strikes on other countries. He understands the cost of war and that America should never be the aggressor. He wants to abolish the PATRIOT Act and give Americans back their freedoms. He is the only major candidate running who is not a member of the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). The CFR’s main goal is to have one North American government. They want to break down borders between America, Canada, and Mexico. If this happens America would lose its sovereignty as an independent nation. This one government would be bad for the people because the members of the government would have too much power.

Stefan Rush
4th Hour

Anonymous said...

9. Which do you think had a bigger impact on the country and why: the Civil Rights or the women's rights movement?

While both the Civil Rights movement and the Women’s Rights movement had a major impact on our country, I believe that the Civil Rights movement had a greater impact. To me, the civil rights movement and the fight for civil rights effectively embodied 300 years of fighting for equality. The thing is, the civil rights movement was not just about fighting for integrated schools or fighting for integrated public bathrooms, it was about following up on what our forefathers set up for us; for all men (and women) to ACTUALLY be equal. This fight transcends over the women’s rights movement in that the civil rights movement meant everyone is equal, everyone has the same rights. While I believe that the Women’s Rights movement made a significant impact on our country, I feel that the Civil Rights movement had much more at stake. Where the Women’s rights movement was about equal rights between men and women, the civil rights movement was about equal rights for EVERYONE. In that way, I feel that the Civil Rights movement embodied the Women’s Rights movement. It had the same premise, but the Civil Rights movement was on a higher scale. Ultimately, the main reason why I believe that the Civil Rights Movement had a greater impact on our country than the Women’s Rights movement was that it affected every citizen of our nation, whereas the women’s rights movement only affected women.

Tyler Friedman
5th Hour

Anonymous said...

Question 23
If I was living in New Orleans in the time right before hurricane Katrina, I would probably vacate the premises as soon as possible. I love my home. It would kill me to leave Michigan if we were in a similar situation, but I would do it because it would greatly benefit my family. If I stayed, my family would have stayed, and would’ve possibly been hurt or killed. I would wait for New Orleans to be reconstructed, then I would move back home. I think that so many people stayed in New Orleans because it is very hard for some to leave their home. The people who stayed could’ve had family in that area as well, it is especially hard to leave family members behind. The people in New Orleans love it there because of the atmosphere; it is the home to jazz, Cajun food, and mardi gras. Those who stayed probably just though that the aftermath of the hurricane wouldn’t be so bad. They thought it would just blow over, and if it didn’t that the government would help them out. Ultimately, the people who stayed should have foreseen the worst, and the people who left were using their common sense.

TJ Hyland
5th Hour

Anonymous said...

Question 23:
If I lived in New Orleans in 2005 when Hurricane Katrina hit and had the choice to stay or leave, I would definitely leave. I know that it would be hard to leave my house behind after living there for so long but I would rather have to rebuild my house than risk dying and also I would expect help from the government since it was such a huge disaster. If I stayed there I would’ve been stuck on my roof like many others waiting for someone to come and save me when I could save myself, not to mention after waiting for that long I probably would’ve ended up doing what many others did and using a make shift raft to get to the Silver Dome or something. It would be very hard to leave my house and neighborhood behind but for myself and my families safety my first act would be to get out of the area.

Jessica Keyes
4th hour

Anonymous said...

1.Affirmative action is the act of making sure minorities get support and equal chances in such things as academics, jobs, and sports. I think that the affirmative action is good and bad for America. I think that affirmative action is good because it gives minorities chances that they may not have ever gotten. This also creates a more diverse nation and lets different races work together in the same work place. I think that America needs more integration and needs to accept all races for who they are and not judge them because they look different. This will help lessen discrimination and racism. This will help America become a better nation and will help make everyone and every race more happy. I think that affirmative action is bad for America because it sometimes gives spots to minorities that shouldn’t have them or didn’t deserve them. An example is that if someone loses a job or gets rejected from a job or school to someone that is less qualified for it because affirmative action, that is an unfair advantage for that person. This has been happening a lot lately, especially at schools. Students get rejected because of affirmative action and their spot was given to someone that didn’t deserve the spot as much as the rejected student. It helps create a more diverse campus, but also gives minorities an unfair advantage over the majorities.

Jason Schreiber
4th hour

Anonymous said...

Who do you think was the most influential woman in the women's movement? Why?

I think that the most influential woman in the women’s movement was, without a doubt, Betty Friedan. She might not have been part of the riots and protests. But she started the movement. She was able to start the entire women’s civil rights movement. When she made her book, The Feminine Mystique, she gave the ideas and courage to all women in the United States. Her book inspired the main leaders of the women’s movement towards civil rights. And the main ideas were to simply let women to become more than a stay at home mom. Instead of doing the housework and raising the kids they can start a career that will support them and their kids for life. They can be independent, if they wish, from men. But even if they don’t want to be independent they could still be able to obtain jobs or careers. These are the ideas that Betty Friedan inspired. And they were the main ideas behind the women’s civil rights platform. And with these ideas in mind they almost made an amendment that could bring them all of those ideas, in the equal rights amendment. But even though it didn’t get ratified, changes have definitely occurred since the 1960’s.

Ben Tredwell
4th

Anonymous said...

23.
If I lived in New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina struck I think I would have left the city because it wouldn’t be worth it to stay. I would want to protect my family and my life more than I would want to stay home in New Orleans. I would’ve known that hurricanes are no joke and that they are deadly. The Government knew how powerful the hurricane was and I have no intention of sticking around during a category five hurricane. I would’ve gathered all of my essential things and everything sentimental to me and taken them with me out of the state. Homes and material things can be replaced but life is something that once gone will never return and it’s just not worth it to risk my life for my property. I think that people, who could’ve left, stayed because they didn’t want to lose everything that they worked for. Many of the people who stayed grew up in New Orleans and aren’t willing to leave their home, even if they knew a hurricane was coming. Other people who stayed underestimated the intensity of the hurricane. They didn’t think that it would be as bad as it was and weren’t willing to leave their business or home for a hurricane that they thought wasn’t that bad.
Robbie Lewis 5th

Robbie L. said...

23.
If I lived in New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina struck I think I would have left the city because it wouldn’t be worth it to stay. I would want to protect my family and my life more than I would want to stay home in New Orleans. I would’ve known that hurricanes are no joke and that they are deadly. The Government knew how powerful the hurricane was and I have no intention of sticking around during a category five hurricane. I would’ve gathered all of my essential things and everything sentimental to me and taken them with me out of the state. Homes and material things can be replaced but life is something that once gone will never return and it’s just not worth it to risk my life for my property. I think that people, who could’ve left, stayed because they didn’t want to lose everything that they worked for. Many of the people who stayed grew up in New Orleans and aren’t willing to leave their home, even if they knew a hurricane was coming. Other people who stayed underestimated the intensity of the hurricane. They didn’t think that it would be as bad as it was and weren’t willing to leave their business or home for a hurricane that they thought wasn’t that bad.
Robbie Lewis 5th

Anonymous said...

23. If you had lived in New Orleans or in the Gulf Coast region in late August 2005 and Hurricane Katrina was bearing down on the area (pretending you don't know the aftermath, of course), would you have evacuated or stuck it out? Why? Why do you think so many people who could leave stayed? – Sarah
If I was living in the New Orleans or in the Gulf Coast region in late August 2005 and Hurricane Katrina was bearing down on the area I would have probably wanted to stay but I would probably leave because of my parents. I would have wanted to stay, because in my lifetime there was never a hurricane I could remember that was as devastating as Hurricane Katrina turned out to be. There would probably always be warnings about hurricanes but I wouldn’t remember any that had hit or hurt and devastated New Orleans. Some people didn’t even have the option to leave the city and that would be terrible. I also would stick it out because I would feel comfortable with the levis and the setup of the city to help protect me in case the hurricane actually hit and I would probably expect help to come soon after the hurricane hit. These are the same reasons why I think that quite a few people who could leave New Orleans or Louisiana stayed because they felt confident that nothing really terrible was going to happen and if something really bad did happen there would be help and support very soon.

Phil Bolton 5th

Carleigh Bechtolt said...

Why do you think women in the 1950s were so dissatisfied with living "the ideal life" as a housewife?

Women of the 1950s were unsatisfied with living “the ideal life” as a housewife because they wanted to be treated the same as the men of the 1950s. They were also unsatisfied about being housewives and living “the ideal life” because they wanted to be treated equally with men. They wanted the same rights as the men because they wanted to be able to get jobs outside of the house and not be forced to work as a housewife. The women wanted to get jobs outside of the house because they wanted to prove that they could be just like men and work at the same places as them. Many women thought that they could work in the same conditions as the men, but women like Phyllis Schlafly, think that women should not be in the same rank as the men. She thought that they should stay where they belong and let the men do the jobs outside of the house.

Carleigh Bechtolt
5th

Anonymous said...

Today I would join the tactics of Martin Luther King over Malcolm X, for many reasons. Martin Luther King was different then many leaders and preachers in the civil rights movements. Many felt rightfully angry at what was happening in the world, angry at the discrimination placed upon the blacks by the whites. The preachers often wanted to turn to violence to get revenge at the whites. Martin Luther King was one of the victims of discrimination like all blacks, but he didn’t let it change his morals and didn’t make him turn to violence. Instead of acting like the Whites and turn to violence, he turned to peaceful protest and preached of equality for everyone, not just blacks. He preached for something much bigger then himself, and influenced and was heard from people nationwide. In a way he went beyond his time, and didn’t focus on anytime, but in general, equality. His speeches and acts helped Blacks earn freedom enormously because he was speaking to whites and blacks and praying for everyone, he cared for everyone, and he was successful. Malcolm X was one of the leaders in the civil rights that let his anger take the best of him, and he wanted to turn to violence. He claimed that all whites were evil and that there should be segregation, he wanted what whites wanted for a long time. In a way he damaged the movement by influencing fellow blacks that the fight was for nothing, and influenced the whites into thinking blacks were violent. The reason Blacks overcame inequality is through peace, not violence. I think that for a long time Malcolm was a corrupt thinker, and Martin Luther King knew the way to end problems through insight and peace.
Paul Sidlosky
5th Hour

Anonymous said...

Will discrimination ever be over in the future?

Will discrimination ever be over in the future. Discrimination has been with us forever. In the past there was always a group or race in charge. There was always a group of people who were treated as a lower class. We have had discrimination in the past in every part of the world. When a religion or certain race is in power. The people below then will always have problem. Discrimination can be not letting someone have a higher education. Certain counties depending upon who you are may allow you to have to live in certain areas. The only way I believe that discrimination can be stopped is when everyone has a chance to go to school, get a good education. That no matter who you are, what race, sex, age you are, that you have the same opportunities to be successful as everyone else. If we can improve the qualities of life, good health care, good housing, and equal opportunities. I believe we can help stop discrimination.

Justin Laffer
5th hr

Anonymous said...

Whoops Forgot my name Michael Guz 4th Hour

21. Pretend you didn't know the outcome of the Children's March: would you have taken a stand with the other kids of Birmingham, AL in May of 1963? Why or why not?

If I was a black child during the time the Children's March happened, I would have been one of the first ones at the march. Imagine watching your people be unfairly beaten, fired, separated from the rest of society. Also, imagine watching people like Martin Luther King, Malcom X, Rosa Parks, and other strong black activists, wouldn't anyone feel tempted or even feel like they need to do the march. This was the chance for so many black children to take part in the activism their role models do and take part in the civil rights movement. Whether I knew the outcome or not, I would have been glad to participate in the movement. If anything, getting arrested would make me feel more tempted because watching Dr. King get arrested for his cause was effective in proving a point and having children arrested would prove a big point to the rest of the nation. When the nation would see videos and hear news of black kids getting arrested, having dogs attack them, and being hosed down would create more reaction and movement than if there was a peaceful march, ignored by the government and people. This march was such a big part of our history and even as a white person, I feel like it would have been a great thing to be a part of and an accomplishing feeling to be part of a movement that was s important and help shape the world.

Anonymous said...

Lorne Carter
2nd Hour
31.) What do you think the “proper shape” is for men and women today?
I think the proper shape for both and women are a healthy shape. We all should strive to be healthy and productive citizens for our community. We shouldn’t want to be others. We should make our own goals. We should set up our own goals for living. Everyone is different, so everyone has different appropriate weight levels. Instead of eating what tastes good, we should eat more food that is good for us. Everyone should live a healthy lifestyle, if not for you, then do it for someone you love and want to be around with longer. A healthy lifestyle consists of a daily exercise, eating right, and lowering stress. We should live a life that is balanced mentally, physically, and emotionally. Better food habits can help you reduce your risk for heart attacks. If you take small steps forward in becoming healthier, you will feel better, and have more self confidence. It’s about becoming comfortable in your own skin. In becoming healthier you will have more daily energy, and have more productivity at school and work. If you take small steps now, it will pay off for a huge investment in the future. In you becoming a healthier person, the ones that you love will appreciate you staying with them a little bit longer.

Anonymous said...

18. Will discrimination ever be over in the future? - Audrey

No, discrimination will still exist in the future. Though we have evolved so much since coming to America, dealing with slaves, women getting the right to vote, and African American freedom, people are discriminated against daily. Many people don’t see it or pay attention, but stereotyping is an act of discrimination. The way we portray Native Americans in upcoming movies is ridiculous. Famous casinos are owned by Native Americans and they are trying to make a name for themselves by becoming successful. Also many schools use the warrior as their mascot which is not too respectful.

It’s also known that many people are against African Americans. People that live in the suburbs of Detroit know that African Americans are the ones first criticized for any form of crime committed. Weather it’s them or not, they are usually punished or suspected. Sometimes people discriminate without even thinking before hand about what they are about to say. It’s really sad how the world works, but discrimination happens to everyone. The only way to get above the bottom of the discrimination chain is to succeed. MLK did whatever he could to get his race to the top, and now we have an African American male in line for presidency.

Mollie Yarsike/5th

Anonymous said...

27.I definitely think that I would have urged my state representative to vote for the E.R.A. amendment. Men and women should have had equal rights back before and when this amendment was brought forward, then should now, and they should in the future. Men and women may not be made exactly the same, but that’s what makes us unique. Women are stereotypically housewives, and the ones who take care of the family, while the husband supports the family. I don’t think that women are better nurturers of children just because they are the carriers of the babies. I think that men can do just as good of a job of raising children, and it is important in a child’s life to have a mom and a dad that they can look up to. I would have never worked with Phyllis Schlafly because I completely disagree with her. I think that if women want to they should be allowed to go into the military. Men and women should have to same opportunities to get the most out of life, they shouldn’t be categorized into certain jobs because of their gender.

Christy Slowinski
2nd hour

Anonymous said...

1. I think that affirmative action is bad for America. I think that in the 20th century this idea was great because blacks were heavily segregated against. Now most blacks and whites go to the same schools and we all have equal opportunities. I think it is unfair for certain groups of people to do worse in the same schools and get in before people who did better. I think that race and ethnicity should be no factor in college. I think that affirmative action was a major contributor in the movement for separate but equal but now it’s turning unfair. It really aided the African Americans in getting into college and getting a good education and helped them get jobs and get their lives turned around. Now it seems like they don’t have to work as hard as other people. It is almost like they are just cheating the system. This might seem racist, but it really isn’t. I think it’s just unfair and needs to change. America is the melting pot for all ethnicities and its great that everyone is getting a good education but when some don’t have to work as hard and people who are working harder and might deserve it more are getting declined you know something is wrong.

Fred Carington
5th Hour

Anonymous said...

I think that someone so unimportant to politics like Bill Russell (or other sports figures in today's world) can have a big social/cultural impact on America because everyone pays attention to what they say because they are hero's to some people. In the sports 50world, people idol sports players because they are they're hero's. Most people want to be just like that person because he is so great. They do everything that that sports player does. They wear what he wears, eat what he eats, and owns whatever they own. But the really big 50thing that they do that their sport's hero does is do what ever they tell them to do. If they tell them to go eat at a place they will eat there or if they tell them what kind of car to buy, they will buy it. So when a 50sports player tell everyone to give charity to a organization, the people do it. This helps politicians a lot because if the sports hero is on the democrat or republican side, then the people who idol that sports star will go on which ever side that sports star is on.

Jake Cramer

Anonymous said...

I think that the kids in the children’s march changed history for the better. if i was in that situation as they were i would do the same things that they had done. i feel this way because those kids were taking a stand for what they believe in. they took the water hoses, the police dogs, and the beatings from that march which ended segregation. during that time period i too would take a stand, especially if i had motivated speaker suck MLK and Malcolm X too inspire me too believe that there can and will be a better society and world that I knew of then.

Kathy Kakoz
2nd hour

Anonymous said...

Even if New Orleans is rebuilt it will be because of t he people, but i think it is an shaky situation. The southern part of new Orleans might have to be built farther out into the Gulf, the levees would have to be built higher.
New Orleans is alreeady sinking. Qouted "for every five feet added to a levee, the levee sinks three feet deeper". So sooner or later the levees will break down. Many people have evacuated to other cities and have made that there home , so not many of the citizens will come back because of things lost and if an occurance like this happens again.. what if amother hurricane doesn't blow away the billions of dollars worth of work will be worthless.

ashley davis

Anonymous said...

Is affirmative action good or bad?

Personally, I do not think that affirmitive action is fair in terms of accepting students into colleges and universitys. I understand that some school districts in America are not as wealthy, or do not have as many resources as other schools to teach. I also understand that these school districts might be of different race than other school districts. This is why affirmitive action was started – to give students who are not as fortunate as other students in America the same chance at getting into universitys and colleges after highschool. I understand all of this, but I do not agree with it. I think every student in America should be selected for colleges based on their grades and achievements throughout highschool, not on their race. I don’t think it is fair that a student with a lower grade point average can get into a school, while someone with straight A’s can’t, because of what race they are. It is already so hard to be accepted into good colleges; why should it be even harder just because you are not the right race to meet the affirmative action demand? I can see why affirmative action is used to help students who aren’t as lucky as others, but at the same time, it is not helping students who work just as hard, but are part of a non-minority group. Colleges should accept students based on their acedemic achievements, and not on what race they are.

Bethany Slon
5th hour

Anonymous said...

19. Even though V.P. Al Gore had won the popular vote in the 2000 election, he lost the electoral vote to Governor George Bush. Do you agree that the current voting system we have is o.k. (with the electoral college) or should it be reformed to something else? – Paul
I think that the vote system should be revised. It seems to me that the person with the most votes should win and that’s that. Why should we have a complicated system for something that isn’t really complicated at all? I just think that popular vote is more accurate and makes more sense.
8. Do you think we would be closer to energy independence and newer forms of alternative fuel if Al Gore had won the election in 2000 instead of George W. Bush? - Tyler H.
I think that we probably would be closer to energy independence. Of course there is no way to truly know but it seems to me that a lot of the problems in America today would not exist if Gore had been elected President. He probably would have put a focus on energy efficiency which would help some of our economic problems. And he probably would have handled the war situation better, reacted to Katrina better and faster. Over all I think electing President Bush was a bad choice and I think a lot of people are seeing that now. This is part of the reason why I believe that the voting system should be revised. Gore could have probably made this country a much better place or at least a less bad place, unlike Bush.

Sarah Zamler
5th Hour

Anonymous said...

If you were 18 this year, who would you have voted for in each of the primaries and why?

I would have voted for Barack Obambambam for each of the primaries.
I am voting for him because he sounds about his business and he is a black man like I. I like Hilary Clinton, but I really do not want a female president in a country that I live in. It feels funny and I believe she won’t be the only say so if she the president. She has former president Bill Clinton right at home with her in the White House who will always put input into her choices.I want to vote Barack because, I think he will do exactly what he says and not turn out like a presidential version of Kwame Kilpatric who is the mayor of Detroit.As of right now I am 18 so I will be voting for my mans Barack. I like his health Care plan. He looks like he can be my unlcle.

Derrick Brown

Anonymous said...

The reason why I believe that women were dissatisfied being the " ideal house wife" is because women wanted to work also. I mean if you think about women basically did all the work. Women would clean the house, and i know that men would bring food to the table but it was the women that cooked it. I also I believe that women felt disrespected and unwanted at times. Because the men would bring money by working and women could not so they felt that they have no right to say what goes on in the house. So I believe that there was no equal partnership because if there was something to go wrong in the home the women would always get blamed for it.
Tommy Syrkett 2nd Hour

Anonymous said...

since we are talking about the two most life changing men in history, M.L.K. an M.X, and if they were both here today i am very sure that these men would hate to here how our world in working together, i know that for so long that these men were fighting for non violence and then a few years later all we want now is to kill people to get our way i would always stand for what they stand back then but what i want right now is peace becuase all it is doing right now is only destroying us and i thought that the only way to stop is to convince the people that we don't need to fight and we don't need to destroy our enemies beucase if you really think about it we are the only enemy here we are the ones who is getting everyody worked up becuase we have this reputation that we are the best and we have everythign well you know what WE DONT, IT"S KILLING US!!!!!! but in my conclusion MLK, and M.X would be so distraught becuase what if they knew that we are in a war what if they knew that we are killing ourselves and what if they knew that we are dying in the sin that Brought history to us what if they knew?
By: Lydia Gaiters

Anonymous said...

1) i think that Affirmative Action is good for America. Every one should be allowed the same rights. Giving one type of person more rights than another is wrong. If someone is a different race than you, it doesn’t mean that they should have ore rights than you. Besides the fact that its unfair to be judged on the way u look. If that’s true, than what right would anyone have to hold one back because of race. Thankfully, they made Affirmative Action. Since minorities can now have they same opportunities as others, we can now see two main benefits.
1) is that we can now see what others can do. Since, say, African Americans can now play sports with the same supplies and support as others we can see that they can be just as good as us (sometimes better). Now we see what makes each type of person special. That brings the world closer together. 2) Now that all are given equal opportunities, we can all get along better. Yes some people will still be racist and yes some will still be bitter about the past. However, many people will be happy to look forward to the future and can get along with each other. While that may not be definite proof if people are treated equal they will be happier and will be on better terms with others.

Chris Giles
5th hour

Megan W. said...

D.I.Y.- Do you think that affirmative action is good for America.

I do not think that affirmative action is good for America. I think that people should be treated equally, and not be judged by their race. I n my opinion, if the government implies that there is a difference between two different people because of their race, that people will start to believe it. I think that if two candidates are after a job, of a place at a school, and they have equal qualifications, their race should have nothing to do with whom to hire. I think that by giving African American, Native American, or any other kind of American people an advantage, it makes America a much less fair place. During the civil rights movement people worked hard to give black people equal rights as whites. I think that by unevening the playing field, than history is just repeating itself. I do not believe that race has to do with the qualifications of a person or their abilities. I think that race should not be asked in college applications and I think that of America begins to see certain races differently from others, it will cause stereotypes to be made, and people will racism will grow.

Megan W.

alyssa t. said...

If i was Fannie Lou Hamer yes i would believe that it would be worth the hassle to vote. I would say yes because i feel that the President or whom ever is running is serving you, weather they like it or not black people and women were still American Citizens and should have had the same rights as everyone else. When you take a stand, not only are you helping the situation but your giving people the courage to stand up and voice their opinion as well. As an aMERICAN citizen if eel that if you are able to vote you should,because when things happen like the War or the economy crashing you dont have the right to have animosity to that President for the simple fact you didnt vote, your one vote could have helped,but you didnt. I totally agree with Fannie Lou Hamer and everything that she stood for, and her famous quote....
'I'm sick and tired of being sick and tired'.
Alyssa T.
4th Hr.

Anonymous said...

It took President bush a long time to getto the victims of hurricane katrina because he thought thought that the fedeal emergency mike brown was doing a good job and had everything under control in Louisana.
Rae 2nd hour

Anonymous said...

I think.
Mr. Senator Obama was saying that although it’s not slavery, we yet have equal~equal rights. The people of America are trying to throw the race issue at him especially because, he is a black man. If I was Barack Obama I would be expecting to get questioned about things that has no matter to the election. Obama, I think is trying to use the whole integration time (old school) to win the election. But if he keeps focusing on that he will not win because, people get tired of it. Like me yo, im getting tired of him. It’s like he is focusing too much on Dr. King dream and forgetting the overall power of the election.


Derrick Brown

Emma said...

18. Will discrimination ever be over in the future? - Audrey

Discrimination will never be over. It’s human nature to judge. It has gotten a lot better over the years but there is still a lot of hatred towards people. Though we do now have mixed schools and anyone can go to public places. There are still racist, anti-Semitic, and sexists people. Same sex marriage is still illegal, though everyone is suppose to be accepted. The words gay, retarded, nigger, cracker, and other derogative terms are still thrown around and accepted. Not a day goes by where I don’t hear those words multiple times. I even find myself using some at times. People say these without knowing how hurtful the terms are and how hateful they are as well. Discrimination is everywhere though we may not know it. How can this go away when half the time it goes unnoticed? If people cannot notice that discrimination is everywhere how can we eliminate it? The answer is it can’t. It will never go away if it cannot even be stopped with the new age of kids. It will continue on in the future and it could even get worse. No one knows what will happen in the future but you can look on the present and take an educated guess.


Emma

Anonymous said...

6. Why do you think someone so unimportant to politics like Bill Russell (or other sports figures in today's world) can have such a big social/cultural impact on America?

First of all no one is not “unimportant” to the world of politics if they can make a difference. I think sports figures and other celebrities have such a big social/cultural impact on America because they are looked up to and people want to be like them, they will do what you do because you are there idol. Another reason sports figures, movie stars, musicians, and millionaires make a difference is because they are not afraid to speak up even if they will get criticized, examples of this are: Bill Russell and his fight against racism and civil rights, Kobe Bryant starting a charity to help starving children Africa and Iraq, David Stern commissioner of the NBA creating the NBA cares program demanding all NBA players to have at least 50 community service hours or they will be suspended for at least 3 games depending on how short they were.

Ryan Gillis
5th